Secret Wins Rolex Sydney Hobart - Sail Magazine

Secret Wins Rolex Sydney Hobart

Australian skipper Geoff Boettcher, owner of the Reichel/Pugh 51 Secret Men’s Business 3.5, has won the 2010 Rolex Sydney Hobart Race, taking the Tattersall’s Cup, which goes to the fastest boat in the fleet on corrected time.The 2010 race, one of the roughest in recent memory, was Boettcher’s 22nd Sydney Hobart. Nineteen out of the 87 boats that started had to withdraw due to
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Australian skipper Geoff Boettcher, owner of the Reichel/Pugh 51 Secret Men’s Business 3.5, has won the 2010 Rolex Sydney Hobart Race, taking the Tattersall’s Cup, which goes to the fastest boat in the fleet on corrected time.

The 2010 race, one of the roughest in recent memory, was Boettcher’s 22nd Sydney Hobart. Nineteen out of the 87 boats that started had to withdraw due to mechanical problems, which included everything from torn sails to damaged rudders and at least one dismasting. No one was seriously injured.

Line honors went to the 100-footer Wild Oats XI, the fifth time in six years the boat has been the first to complete the 628-mile course from Sidney, Australia, to Hobart, Tasmania.

Regarding the rough conditions that marked this year’s race, Boettcher said, “We had to take our foot off the pedal a bit in Bass Strait, but we pushed the boat and crew to the limit. You have to if you want to win. We experienced 50 knots, choppy seas and big waves. Sometimes it was a challenge just getting on deck.”

Boettcher’s crew included Tasmanian Julian Freeman, champion match racer Michael Dunstan and skiff world champion Euan McNicol, both from New South Wales, and South Australian James Paterson who is making a name for himself in the Olympic Finn dinghy class.

For more on the 2010 Rolex Sydney Hobart, click here.

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