Race 2, Match 32, the America's Cup

Despite statistics indicating a 9.8-knot average around the course for Emirates Team New Zealand, versus a 9.9-knot average for Alinghi, the Kiwi team on Sunday took Race 2 and tied the America's Cup 1-1. Here's the report from America's Cup Media.Valencia, 24 June, 2007 - Emirates Team New Zealand came from behind to beat Alinghi on Sunday afternoon, squaring the score in the 32nd
Author:
Publish date:

Despite statistics indicating a 9.8-knot average around the course for Emirates Team New Zealand, versus a 9.9-knot average for Alinghi, the Kiwi team on Sunday took Race 2 and tied the America's Cup 1-1. Here's the report from America's Cup Media.

Valencia, 24 June, 2007 - Emirates Team New Zealand came from behind to beat Alinghi on Sunday afternoon, squaring the score in the 32nd America's Cup Match. Each team has one win, going in to Monday's lay day.

Conditions were ideal for racing again on Sunday, with the warm Valencian sun generating a 10 knot sea breeze. And for the second consecutive day, an enormous spectator fleet surrounded the race course.

Emirates skipper Dean Barker had the better start, crossing the line three seconds ahead of SUI 100. But it didn't take long for Alinghi helmsman Ed Baird to squeeze up from leeward, forcing the Kiwis to tack away. When the boats next converged, it was Alinghi with the lead and control of the race. But the second lap of the course belonged to the Kiwis, who made the pass on the second beat and extended on the run to the finish to square the series.

Monday is scheduled as an 'off day'. Racing in the 32nd America's Cup Match will resume on Tuesday afternoon. Race Three is scheduled to start at 15:00 with a warning signal at 14:50.

Match 2 -Emirates Team New Zealand beat Alinghi - DELTA 0:28

Emirates Team New Zealand neutralised Alinghi's starboard entry advantage into the pre-start by sailing clean across their bow. An aggressive pre-start ensued with both helmsmen fighting for the right. Dean Barker got the hook on Ed Baird, forcing Alinghi into a tack. Barker followed into a tack and moved again to the right of the Defender, determined to win the end of the starting line nearest to the Race Committee boat.

As both boats wound up to speed for the final approach, it was NZL 92 that was faster to accelerate, crossing the line three seconds ahead of the SUI 100. With a half-boatlength advantage and the breeze and wave conditions much softer than the day before, the Kiwis must have hoped that they could live in that position and control the match out to the left.

However, just as the day before, Baird got SUI 100 fully up to speed and started edging forward and higher compared with NZL 92. The Kiwis couldn't stay in position, and were forced to tack away. It was almost a carbon copy of Saturday's match, with Alinghi tacking over to shadow the Kiwi boat. At the first cross SUI 100 was more than two boatlengths ahead and they controlled the match to lead by 19 seconds around the first mark.

The New Zealanders attacked downwind however, managing to close the deficit to 13 seconds by the leeward gate, where Alinghi took the left and the Kiwis the right-hand option at the gate. Brad Butterworth played a loose cover game up the second beat, looking confident in his speed and wanting to protect the right once he had successfully swapped sides with Terry Hutchinson.

However, Butterworth's open tactics backfired as the Kiwis got back on level terms, coming in from the left with Alinghi forced to tack to leeward. Dean Barker did an excellent job of holding his position to windward on the Swiss, and took the match out to the right-hand layline. From this point the race moved firmly into New Zealand control, leading around the final mark by 15 seconds.

Alinghi threw many gybes at the final run, trying to wriggle around the Kiwis, but all to no avail as Dean Barker brought NZL 92 across the finish 28 seconds ahead.

32nd America's Cup Match by Louis Vuitton - Race Two

The first team to win five points wins the America's Cup.

Related

arc18-3981

Stories from the Cruisers of the ARC

Each December, the docks at Rodney Bay Marina in St. Lucia are abuzz as the fleet of the ARC—the Atlantic Rally for Cruisers—arrives to much fanfare. No matter what time of day or night, the staff of the World Cruising Club, organizers of the 33-year-old rally, are there to ...read more

TOTW_PromoSite

SAIL's Tip of the Week

Presented by Vetus-Maxwell. Got a tip? Send it to sailmail@sailmagazine.com A sign from outside the box  Rev counters on modern engines are driven electronically from a terminal on the alternator. If all is well, as soon as the engine fires up the revs will read true. If, ...read more

emSelf-tacking-jib

Ask Sail: Are Self-trackers Worth It?

Q: I’m seeing more and more self-tacking jibs out on the water (and in the pages of SAIL) these days. I can’t help thinking these boats are all hopelessly underpowered, especially off the wind, when compared to boats with even slightly overlapping headsails. But I could be ...read more

01-LEAD-hose-leak-CREDIT-BoatUS

Know how: Is Your Bilge Pump up to the Job?

Without much reflection, I recently replaced my broken bilge pump with a slightly larger model. After all, I thought, surely an 800 gallon-per-hour (gph) pump will outperform the previous 500gph unit? Well, yes, but that’s no reason to feel much safer, as I soon discovered. The ...read more

190314-viddy

St. Maarten Heineken Regatta: A Source of Hope

The tagline for the St. Maarten Heineken Regatta is "serious sailing, serious fun." However, for the inhabitants of St. Maarten, the event is more than just a festival of great music and some of the best sailing around. Local blogger Angie Soeffker explains the impact the race ...read more

SPOTX-1500x1500_front

Gear: SPOT-X Satellite

Hits the SPOT The SPOT-X two-way satellite messenger is an economical way of staying connected to the outside world via text or e-mail when you’re at sea. As well as the messaging service, it has a distress function that not only alerts authorities if you’re in trouble, but lets ...read more

_8105684

A Kid’s Take on the Northwest Passage

Going North—and West Crack! Crunch! I woke with a start to the sound of ice scraping the hull of our 60ft sailboat, Dogbark. In a drowsy daze, I hobbled out of the small cabin I was sharing with my little sister. As I emerged into the cockpit, I swiveled my head, searching for ...read more