Kiwi Spirit Takes Line Honors in Bermuda

Author:
Publish date:
Kiwi Spirit barrels toward the starting line in the 22nd annual Marion Bermuda race

Kiwi Spirit barrels toward the starting line in the 22nd annual Marion Bermuda race

Mark Riley’s Farr 63 Kiwi Spirit secured line honors yesterday in the Marion to Bermuda race, finishing off St. David’s Lighthouse at 0227 local time. Francis Seldorff’s Kinship, a Baltic 52, was second in the 40-boat fleet, crossing the line at around 0500.

With 18-year-old Jonathan, or "Jo," Riley at the helm and father, Mark, as navigator, Kiwi Spirit looked at press time to be correcting out in seventh place in Class A. However, that hasn’t daunted Jo’s enthusiasm for their outstanding passage.

Jo is 18. This is his fourth Marion Bermuda Race. Of his four 645-mile rides to Bermuda, three have been line-honors winners. Better still, this latest line-honors finish means the young skipper is the winner of this year’s Blue Water Sailing Cub Board of Governor’s Trophy.

The young crew of the 92ft schooner Tabor Boy sailed a smart, consistent race from start to finish

The young crew of the 92ft schooner Tabor Boy sailed a smart, consistent race from start to finish

Kiwi Spirit (originally built for Stanley Paris as part of his failed attempt at Dodge Morgan’s 150-day solo, cruising boat circumnav record) was very much a family effort time, with Mark’s daughter plus three cousins and a brother-in-law making up the better part of the crew. Also aboard was Chuck Fontaine a lifelong friend who has run the Mass Maritime Sailing Program and is a kind of adopted member of the Riley family.

"We bought the boat for the reason we are doing this race. It is manageable with limited experienced people, yet big enough that we could take a lot of family and friends on board and enjoy some nice bluewater sailing," Mark said prior to the start.

Jo added, "It was meant for shorthanded sailing. Since we are taking so many family members it met all of our needs. We want to go fast and finish in our slot."

Also finishing on Tuesday was the Tabor Academy flagship Tabor Boy, a 92ft gaff-rigged schooner. Unfortunately, her main competition, Spirit of Bermuda was disqualified early on because she was outside of the yellow pin, beyond the starting line, which caused her to be ruled a non-starter.

As it was, Tabor Boy sailed a consistent race in the celestial navigation class and participated in the Youth Challenge Cup, as two-thirds of her 23 alumni and student crew were under the age of 23.

For more on the race, which is organized by Beverly Yacht Club, the Blue Water Sailing Club and the Royal Hamilton Amateur Dinghy Club, as well as complete results, click here.  

June 2019

Related

Alchemist_Ken Read_doublehanded

Ida Lewis Draws Record-Breaking Numbers

On Saturday, Aug. 15, Newport’s Ida Lewis Distance Race (which is being sponsored this year by Jeanneau America) will kick off with a record number of entrants on the starting line. With many other events cancelled this summer, the annual event has attracted more participants ...read more

RACE_STRATIS_LION_07

Doyle Sails

As sailors, our obsession with sailing connects us to the water – the water is our playground, a sanctuary where we all seek enjoyment, a competitive playing field where we race as comrades; it’s sometimes our home; and always a place that unlocks our sense of adventure ...read more

Screen Shot 2020-08-13 at 9.42.30 AM

Helly Hansen Saltro Jacket

Helly Hansen's new Saltro Jacket is a lightweight outer layer with two-ply construction, a fleece-lined collar and SOLAS-approved reflector patches. The outer layer is made with Helly Tech, Helly Hansen's trademarked membrane that keeps water from seeping in while still ...read more

01-LEAD-PHOTO-CYOA-view-boat-st-john-caneel

Charter Resource Directory

MAIN RESOURCE INDEX PAGE Although the bareboat charter industry was hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic this past spring, things are opening up again. To help prospective charterers make sense of the situation, we’ve put together this online charter resources directory in ...read more

IMG_0207

Ask Sail: How Far to Ease Out?

Q: When sailing dead downwind (assume 22 knots of wind), if the main is eased out to 90 degrees relative to the wind (perpendicular to the wind) are roughly the same forces applied to the sail as to the sail if it isn’t quite out all the way, say, 75 degrees to the wind? My ...read more

200803

Video: A Close Look at the AC75

The AC75 rule crafted for the upcoming 36th America’s Cup was intended to be open to multiple interpretations, and the result has been four very different designs. Coupled with the fact the AC75 is unlike any other boat that has ever come before, the current Cup cycle is fast ...read more