Clipper Yacht Race's Leg 7 Comes to a Close - Sail Magazine

Clipper Yacht Race's Leg 7 Comes to a Close

Nearly two weeks after leaving Panama, all 10 teams of the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race have reached New Jersey, successfully finishing Leg 7.
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Nearly two weeks after leaving Panama, all 10 teams of the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race have reached New Jersey, successfully finishing Leg 7.

Gold Coast Australia, Visit Finland and De Lage Landen nabbed the three podium places, extending their leads in the overall standings. Geraldton Western Australia secured fourth place, only an hour behind the third place finish, followed by Edinburgh Inspiring Capital, Singapore, Welcome to Yorkshire, and New York. Qingdao and Derry-Londonderry brought up the rear.

For Edinburgh Inspiring Capital, it was the highest position they’ve finished in the Clipper Race so far. At one point, they led the race, but were sabotaged by suddenly light winds.

“We were overtaken, but we hung on and it was a great feeling to be in the mix with the big guys,” says skipper Flavio Zamboni.

The Clipper Round the World Yacht Race consists of eight legs broken down by port checkpoints into 15 individual races. Crews will sail a total of 40,000 miles, making it the longest yacht race in the world. Amateurs from all walks of life with a desire to sail apply to participate. Each boat is led by a professional skipper, but anyone wanting to be a part of the crew can register for consideration, even if they have never sailed before. Applications for the 2013-2014 Clipper Race are currently being accepted.

The 2011-2012 teams will sail from New Jersey June 3 to the North Cove Marina in New York, where they will kick off Race 12 to Nova Scotia, a journey estimated to last five days.

The yacht race will finish in the UK.

Photo courtesy of World Wide Images/Clipper Round the World Race

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