BSL Leads the Global Ocean Race Fleet

Day two of the Global Ocean Race 2011-2012 proved a lively, welcome change from yesterday’s light air start in Palma Bay, Mallorca, Spain. Led by Ross and Campbell Field on BSL, the six double-handed Class 40s continue to race toward the Straits of Gibraltar, and eventually Cape Town, in an effort to complete the first leg of the five-leg, 30,000-mile journey around the globe. With
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Day two of the Global Ocean Race 2011-2012 proved a lively, welcome change from yesterday’s light air start in Palma Bay, Mallorca, Spain. Led by Ross and Campbell Field on BSL, the six double-handed Class 40s continue to race toward the Straits of Gibraltar, and eventually Cape Town, in an effort to complete the first leg of the five-leg, 30,000-mile journey around the globe.

With help from the Real Club Nutico de Palma (RCNP), the Global Ocean Race (GOR) began at 1400 local time on Sunday, 25 September. Though the Franco-British duo of Halvard Mabire and Miranda Merron was first to cross the start line on their Pogo 40S Campagne de France, The Fields, a father-and-son team from New Zealand aboard BSL, opted for an inshore route and were able to round the single mark six minutes ahead of Campagne de France.

As of Monday, BSL continued to lead the fleet, followed closely by Campagne de France; the South African team of Nick Leggatt and Phillippa Hutton-Squire on Phesheya-Racing; Conrad Colman and Hugo Ramon with their Akilaria RC2, Cessna Citation; and Marco Nannini and Paul Peggs aboard Financial Crisis. The Dutch team of Nico Budel and Ruud van Rijsewijk are currently trailing BSL by 40 miles aboard Sec. Hayai.

“It was a pretty light start to the race, involving quite a few sail changes,” says Merron. “We were swearing at clouds - no wind, handled better by some of the competition - but now it is a rather nice Monday morning at the office, sunny, 15-18 knots of wind, under spinnaker.”

Once the GOR fleet passes through the Mediterranean and reaches the Straits of Gibraltar, approximately 450 miles from Mallorca, their next turning mark is at the Brazilian Island of Fernando de Noronha. From there, they will descend toward the notoriously challenging Doldrums, also known as Pot au Noir and, finally, reach Cape Town, South Africa. If all goes according to plan, the GOR fleet will arrive in Cape Town, and prepare to depart on the next leg of their journey, at the end of November.

For more information on the Global Ocean Race, including videos of the race’s launch and interviews with each team, click here.

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