And Then there were Three? - Sail Magazine

And Then there were Three?

Puma Ocean Racing powered by Berg’s Volvo 70 Mar Mostro’s mast has suffered serious damage to its mast, making it the third of the six boats in the fleet to suffer serious damage in the first of nine legs making up the 2011-12 Volvo Ocean Race.
Author:
Publish date:

Puma Ocean Racing powered by Berg’s Volvo 70 Mar Mostro has suffered serious damage to its mast, making it the third of the six boats in the fleet to suffer damage in the first of nine legs making up the 2011-12 Volvo Ocean Race.

realvolvo_0

"We were sailing on a port tack, beam reaching in 22-23 knots of breeze, heading northeast with eight to 10 foot waves, when the mast failed. There were no warning signs. There was no panic on board, and all crew are safe and well," said Mar Mostro skipper Ken Read. "Thanks to amazing seamanship, the three pieces of the mast and all of the sails were recovered. We haven’t suspended racing at this point and are weighing our options. At this point we are not using our engine, but are taking some time to clear our heads and evaluate next steps. Our plans may include heading to the island of Tristan da Cunha – about 700 nautical miles from us, nearly on the way to Cape Town."

Mar Mostro’s rig failed at approximately 1500 UTC in the southern Atlantic Ocean, about 2,150 nautical miles from Cape Town, South Africa. At the time she was in second place, chasing at the heels of Team Telefonica, with its Spanish skipper Iker Martinez.

The first leg, which started 17 days ago in Alicante, Spain, has proven to be a true boat buster, with Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing and China’s Team Sanya both sustaining damage just hours into the race that forced them to withdraw.

"These are the saddest and most disappointed 11 people on earth. We were in a comfortable second position, traveling south to get into the final front and head across the southern Atlantic towards Cape Town," Read said. "We were planning to be there in five days. At this stage, my goal is to make sure we get this crew back safely and we will then look at options as to how to get back in this race."

For more information, click here.

Related

Outremer45

Boat Review: Outremer 45

It’s funny the way things that work right almost inevitably tend to look right as well. Case in point: the Outremer 45, a catamaran that can’t help but turn heads with its large rig, nicely sculpted cabintrunk and narrow, purposeful bows. Better yet, under sail the boat more than ...read more

Sunset-Tyrrel-Bay

Charter: Glorious Grenada

In the wake of the hurricanes that devastated the Virgin Islands last year many charterers ended up going farther south to Grenada and the Grenadines where they found the sailing excellent and the vibe just fine“God must have been a sailor when he created the Caribbean,” a friend ...read more

WaterLinesNov

Waterlines: Tangled Up in Pots

I learned to sail on the Maine coast as a boy, and one of the things my elders taught me was to respect fishing gear. If you got caught up with a lobster pot, you did everything you could to get clear without cutting the pot warp. It represented a family’s livelihood and thus was ...read more

7353

Harken’s Reflex 3 top-down Furler

Furl PowerAre you afraid of flying—spinnakers, that is? Harken’s new Reflex 3 top-down furler will tame A-sails on monohulls from 44-58ft and multis from 39-55ft, and Code 0’s on 39-54ft monos and 36-50ft multis. All you do is heave on the furling line and the sail will roll up ...read more

TOTW_PromoSite

SAIL's Tip of the Week

Presented by Vetus-Maxwell.Got a tip? Send it to sailmail@sailmagazine.comDitch the stress Owners of high-freeboard yachts best boarded via the stern sugar-scoop like to back them into a slip, but the process can be fraught on a windy day or when there’s a current running, ...read more