America's Cup Safety Recommendations Updated - Sail Magazine

America's Cup Safety Recommendations Updated

In the wake of the death of America’s Cup Team Artemis sailor Andrew Simpson, regatta director Iain Murray has issued a list of 37 recommendations to be incorporated into the safety plan for the Summer of Racing.
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In the wake of the death of America’s Cup Team Artemis sailor Andrew Simpson, regatta director Iain Murray has issued a list of 37 recommendations to be incorporated into the safety plan for the Summer of Racing.

Murray presented his suggestions in a meeting with the four America’s Cup teams and the America’s Cup Event Authority on May 22 in San Francisco.

“This America’s Cup safety plan is a necessary component of the permit application submitted to the Coast Guard for their consideration,” says Stephen Barclay, America’s Cup CEO.

Murray’s recommendations include structural reviews of AC72 boats and wings, lowering the wind limit by 10 knots to 23 knots maximum and additional support equipment and race management. Specific to enhanced sailor safety, Murray suggests buoyancy aids, body armor, crew locator devices, hands-free breathing apparatus and high-visibility helmets.

Going forward, experts will be brought in to address even further specific safety items, like protective gear for sailors.

Despite its diligent and close work with heads, skippers, designers, engineers, sailors and support boat operators of all four teams in past days, the Review Committee refrained from issuing its own list of safety recommendations due to insurance and liability reasons.

“All four competing America’s Cup teams have cooperated in an open, helpful and constructive way,” Murray says. He also thanked the Review Committee for its “exceptional and efficient work.”

To see the full list of recommendations, click here.

Photo courtesy of americascup.com/Guilain Grenier

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