PxPixel
AC45s Take on Cascais - Sail Magazine

AC45s Take on Cascais

The opening two days of the first-ever World Series racing in the 34th America's Cup gave spectators in Cascais, Portugal, plenty of brilliant views of the lightning-quick AC45s. Here, SAIL brings the racing (and some of the shots) to you. The weekend offered racing at both ends of the spectrum: Saturday dawned grim and cloudy, with conditions that normally would
Author:
Publish date:

The opening two days of the first-ever World Series racing in the 34th America's Cup gave spectators in Cascais, Portugal, plenty of brilliant views of the lightning-quick AC45s. Here, SAIL brings the racing (and some of the shots) to you.

The weekend offered racing at both ends of the spectrum: Saturday dawned grim and cloudy, with conditions that normally would be deemed too light for racing. The first race was abandoned, but the nine AC45s showed off their power in three subsequent races, all sailing in 5 knots of wind or lighter. Sunday featured a return to typical Cascais weather: sunny and windy. Perfect conditions to close out the opening weekend of racing.

ACSpithill2USEME

ORACLE Racing Spithill snagged two wins of the three initial races, finishing Day One six points behind Emirates Team New Zealand. During the first race, ORACLE Racing Spithill demonstrated that with new events come new bugs to be worked out: “We had a problem with the (race communications) system,” said Spithill. “We were outside of the boundary with 2 minutes to go but our screens were blank. The screens came back on after we went around the first mark and obviously it said, ‘You’re disqualified.’ I was like, really?"

Artemis Racing won the first race Saturday and finished the day in second place overall. Skipper Terry Hutchinson noted the tricky conditions and said he was glad to be racing in multihulls: “Otherwise we wouldn’t have gotten the racing in! The guys did a good job working together and picking the right sides of the course." Repeating his mantra, Hutchinson reminded his crew that the big finish is still 24 months away.

ACEmirates



Emirates Team New Zealand finished out the weekend with the good kind of first—first place—and the not-so-good. Bowman Winston MacFarlane was the first official man overboard in the series, after he lost his balance when the winch handle he was grinding snapped. MacFarlane managed to swim out of the paths of the other AC45s to his team's chase boat. “I left the guys in a tough position. It’s tough enough sailing these boats with five guys, so it was going to be hard for them to defend the lead with four guys,” he said. Sure enough, ORACLE Racing Coutts pulled ahead to win the race. Still, MacFarlane harbored no hard feelings from the team. He's the first man overboard, but probably not the last. “I think it’s going to happen quite a bit,” he said.

ACSimon
ACCoutts



On board ORACLE Racing Coutts, skipper Russell Coutts said he and his team won't be doing much resting in the next few days. Instead, they'll be working with New Zealander Daniel Fong, who has been called up to replace headsail trimmer Simon Daubney. During the final practice for the series last Friday, Daubney, broke his hand, which is always a risk when working constantly loaded ropes. The injury is expected to take several weeks to heal. Still, the come-from-behind win Sunday put ORACLE Racing Coutts in second overall, suggesting a few days practice will have Daubney caught up in no time.

For more information on the America's Cup World series, click here.

Related

01_silken_2018-03-08-0052

North U’s Regatta Experience Program

“Want to check the keel?” North U Coach Geoff Becker calls to me from back by the transom. We’ve just suffered our worst finish in the regatta and are absolutely flying on our way back to shore, spinnaker up and heeling at an angle that feels like maybe we’re tempting fate. ...read more

Navy-Sand-Dune_1080

Tucket Footwear’s Giller Shoes

Just for KicksMove over Crocs, there’s a new plastic shoe in town. Unlike the aforementioned fashion crimes, Tucket Footwear’s Giller shoes are made for boating. Water will get in, yes, but it will also run straight out again via rows of “scuppers” in the uppers and a dozen drain ...read more

01-m3113_git170829-294

France’s Maxi-tri Ultime class

It’s hard to believe how far foiling has come since the Moth class figured out how to reliably take to the air in the early 2000s.Was it really only in 2013 that the America’s Cup was dragged kicking and screaming into the foiling world by Emirates Team New Zealand back in San ...read more

GGTobagoCays

Cruising: Guadeloupe to Grenada

Our Dream Yacht Charter delivery started as a “wouldn’t it be fun if” idea. Those are usually misguided, if not downright stupid. But a Bali 4.3 named Jumelles (French for “twins,” appropriately) needed to leave Guadeloupe to do heavier charter work in Grenada, and as soon as I ...read more

TOTW_PromoSite

SAIL's Tip of the Week

Presented by Vetus-Maxwell.Got a tip? Send it to sailmail@sailmagazine.comWhen I bought my boat it had 18 through-hull fittings. To reduce the number of holes in the hull (I ultimately cut them by half), I first re-plumbed the drain hoses from my sinks, scuppers, bilge pumps and ...read more

rokk

Scanstrut: ROKK Charge+

It RokksWith the increasing use of smartphones and tablets for in-cockpit navigation comes the issue of keeping these devices charged, since running nav software will drain those batteries in no time. Scanstrut has come to the rescue with the ROKK Charge+, the first-ever ...read more

GreenCove2-2048

Liveaboard Voting Rights Threatened in Florida

Bucking decades of precedent, a Florida elections officer is refusing to allow customers of a popular mail forwarding service to register to vote in his county. Since 1988, St. Brendan’s Isle of Green Cove Springs in Clay County has provided transient Americans with mail ...read more

shutterstock_55353433

A Lifetime of Sailing

I began my sailing life as a kid in an 8ft El Toro and a 16ft Snipe on Lake Millerton in California’s San Joaquin Valley. I am concluding it as an 80-something in a Rhodes 19 on Lake Damariscotta on the coast of Maine. So what does this have to do with the hardy, oceangoing ...read more