A Painfully Slow Bayview-Mac

Author:
Publish date:
03-Mac-start

Sometimes Aeolus is kind. Sometimes he’s not. But rarely is the ancient Greek “keeper of the winds” as entirely absent as he was for much of this year’s Bell’s Beer Bayview Mackinac Race.

How slow was the 2018 running of the 94-year-old distance race, which always starts on a Saturday in mid-July on lower Lake Huron? So slow that by the time the awards were being handed out the following Tuesday as part of the final party at Mackinac Island’s Grand Hotel, a number competitors were still on the course. So slow that dozens of the 197 boats that crossed the starting line ended up dropping out, many within the first 24 hours.

Most years, the first boats to finish do so on Sunday. But this time around the first two finishers, the Reichel/Pugh Max Z86 Windquest and the Reichel/Pugh 74 Wizard, didn’t arrive until Monday morning. Not only that but when the fleet finally came, it did so en masse, making for plenty work at the finish.

According to race chairman Gary Shoemaker, after Windquest and Wizard there was not another boat until the next seven teams all finished within 15 minutes of one another late that same afternoon. “By midnight only 18 boats had finished, and by 0600 on Tuesday there were 33 left to go, so we finished 146 boats in only six hours,” Shoemaker said. Heavens, and much of that in the dark of night. Pity the poor race committee!

Winning this year’s race 204-mile “Shore Course” division aboard their Declercq 36 Flying Buffalo were Al and Bob Declercq. Winning the longer 259-mile “Cove Island” course, which includes a turning mark over on the Canadian side of Lake Huron, was Matthew Schaedler’s J/122 Blitzkrieg. Taking first in the multihull division were Ben Gougeon and Alan Gurski’s Gougeon 35 trimaran Adagio. “This year was nearly twice the time on the water as last year’s race, requiring a second night at sea,” Gurski said afterward. “Nights are when races are lost.”

Finally, kudos to “the pickle boat,” or last-place finisher, the Seidelmann 299 Sojourner, owned and raced by the Boy Scouts of America Sea Scout Ship 1148. As fate would have it, they had just spent three years renovating their boat in preparation for the race, so giving up was not an option—and they didn’t, ultimately crossing the line early Tuesday evening. Nice job, guys! If any sailors taking part in this year’s drift-fest have reason to be proud it’s you!

For complete results from this year’s Bayview Mackinac Race, visit bycmack.com. 

Photo courtesy of Martin Chumiecki/Bayview Yacht Club

October 2018

Related

qr_main

Antal: QR Clutch

Get a Grip Italian deck gear maker Antal’s two new QR clutches not only have high holding power—up to 3,500lb for the QR10 and 4,800lb for the QR12—they can be opened and released under maximum load, so there’s no longer any need to take up the strain on a winch before freeing a ...read more

leadpicBoxes

DIY: Easy Drawers and Boxes

During the extensive refit of my Pearson 40, I needed to create a significant number of custom-sized plywood drawers and stowage bins, or boxes. These included 10 under-floor storage bins, under-sink organizers, boxes for tools and stores, and even a specially fitted cat ...read more

ARC2018Flags

Tips on Gaining Experience Passagemaking

Whether you want to build a sailing resume or just gain practical experience, getting more miles under your keel is key. You can sail a lifetime of summer afternoons and never quite get the hang of cruising—where creativity and offshore savvy result in self-sufficiency and ...read more

arc18-3981

Stories from the Cruisers of the ARC

Each December, the docks at Rodney Bay Marina in St. Lucia are abuzz as the fleet of the ARC—the Atlantic Rally for Cruisers—arrives to much fanfare. No matter what time of day or night, the staff of the World Cruising Club, organizers of the 33-year-old rally, are there to ...read more

TOTW_PromoSite

SAIL's Tip of the Week

Presented by Vetus-Maxwell. Got a tip? Send it to sailmail@sailmagazine.com A sign from outside the box  Rev counters on modern engines are driven electronically from a terminal on the alternator. If all is well, as soon as the engine fires up the revs will read true. If, ...read more

emSelf-tacking-jib

Ask Sail: Are Self-trackers Worth It?

Q: I’m seeing more and more self-tacking jibs out on the water (and in the pages of SAIL) these days. I can’t help thinking these boats are all hopelessly underpowered, especially off the wind, when compared to boats with even slightly overlapping headsails. But I could be ...read more

01-LEAD-hose-leak-CREDIT-BoatUS

Know how: Is Your Bilge Pump up to the Job?

Without much reflection, I recently replaced my broken bilge pump with a slightly larger model. After all, I thought, surely an 800 gallon-per-hour (gph) pump will outperform the previous 500gph unit? Well, yes, but that’s no reason to feel much safer, as I soon discovered. The ...read more