Skip to main content

A Brutal Atlantic Cup Leg 2

Eärendil crosses the Atlantic Cup Leg 2 finish line in Portland, Maine 

Eärendil crosses the Atlantic Cup Leg 2 finish line in Portland, Maine 

After a light-air Leg 1 from Charleston, South Carolina, to New York City, Leg 2 of the 2018 Atlantic Cup, from the Big Apple to Portland, Maine, was a brutal one, with two teams having to withdraw because of boat damage. Nonetheless, at the end of the day, it was once again the Franco-Italian team of Catherine Pourre of France and Pietro Luciani aboard Eärendil coming in first, giving them a comfortable lead in the series, which concludes this weekend in Portland with a two-day, fully-crewed inshore regatta.

Rounding out the podium was Mike Dreese and Tristan Mouligné in second place aboard Toothface 2 (now in third overall) and Michael Hennessy and Merf Owen in second place aboard Dragon, which boosted the boat to sixth overall following a disappointing 10th-place finish in Leg 1. In second place overall are Micah Davis and Rob Windsor aboard Amhas. For complete results, click here.

The trouble started early on for the 11-boat fleet as it found itself pounding due east directly into “horrendous” seas and sustained winds of 20 to 30 knots and more for the first 48 hours as it fought its way to a “virtual” offshore turning mark southeast of Nantucket.

After that, it was bear away for a red-hot straight-line reach to Portland. However, it was already too late for First Light and Espri Scout, which were forced to retire due to a host of mechanical problems.

“We slammed a lot, two or three times in a really bad way,” Luciani said afterward of the first part of the leg. “We had strong wind and current against us on the side, and the sea state was a little discombobulated.”

“It was wild out there,” Dreese said. “You can see why some of the boats with mechanical issues retired. We had some mechanical issues, nothing life-threatening, but it was really rough…I think we only legit wiped out two or three times. We saw peak winds of 39-40, so the apparent winds were hitting 45.”

Next up for the 11 teams is the aforementioned fully crewed inshore series set for this Saturday and Sunday (June 9-10) in Portland, following a prize-giving ceremony. Despite Eärendil lead, the podium still remains very much in play, with Amhas and Toothface 2 currently tied on points and Angola Cable right behind them. For the latest on the both the Portland series and the Atlantic Cup in general, click here.

 June 2018

Related

20211220-March

PODCAST: New Issue Preview March 2022

In this episode of Point of SAIL, Principal Editor Adam Cort and Managing Editor Lydia Mullan talk about the March 2022 issue, their favorite articles and behind-the-scenes at look SAIL. To listen to more SAIL magazine “Point of SAIL” podcasts, click here. ...read more

Background

Notice to Mariners: Flights of Fancy

The nature of sailboat racing is such that the bigger boats tend to get the lion’s share of attention. Recently, though, I’ve found myself especially impressed by what’s happening at the lighter end of the displacement spectrum. Those paying attention are aware there’s been a ...read more

_DSC8952-2048

Sailing Scholarship for Teenage Girls

The Women’s Sailing Foundation is offering the Sue Corl Youth Sailing Scholarship to one teenage girl, aged 14-19 years old, who wants to expand her sailing experience and needs financial assistance in order to do so. Established in 2015, the scholarship allows the recipient to ...read more

Screen-Shot-2022-01-26-at-9.50.45-AM

Celestial Navigation Part 4

In episode four of The Nav Station’s Celestial Navigation series, learn how to calculate your assumed position and the local hour angle using your Greenwich hour angle and dead reckoning position. Using examples in the western and eastern hemispheres, Andy Howe discusses why the ...read more

AdobeStock_15671180

Orca Encounters in Spain

The waters off the Atlantic coast of the southern Iberian Peninsula can be tough enough as it is, but in recent months resident pods of orcas have created a whole new kind of challenge, ramming boats and chewing off rudders. Though initially confined to smaller vessels, larger ...read more

Screen-Shot-2022-01-13-at-9.26.59-AM2048x

Video: Celestial Navigation Pt3

. In episode three of the Practical Celestial Navigation course, Andy Howe examines the theory behind celestial navigation, the celestial triangle and the celestial sphere, and why it is important to have a basic understanding of each. Topics introduced include zenith position, ...read more

01-LEAD-6.-After-2-years-ashore,-Nada-headsto-the-water-(3)

Sailing in the Time of Covid

In mid-August 2019, my wife, Terrie, and I laid up our Malö 46, Nada, in Falmouth, England, and flew home to Maine. We booked flights back to the UK for May 2020, anticipating a summer of cruising the Atlantic coasts of France and Spain. Then Covid struck. Remember that first ...read more

Ulysse Nardin promo photo

The Ocean Race Names Official Timekeeper

With just under one year before the start of The 2022-23 Ocean Race, Swiss watch manufacturer Ulysse Nardin has been named the official timekeeper of the race. The Ocean Race, formerly known as the Volvo Ocean Race and before that the Whitbread Round the World Race, announced ...read more