Gear for Oceangoing Cruisers - Sail Magazine

Gear for Oceangoing Cruisers

The 28th ARC (Atlantic Rally for Cruisers) finished up in St. Lucia in mid December, and a stroll around the docks at the IGY Rodney Bay Marina yielded some interesting sights. Not least among them was the number of general-purpose production cruisers that weren’t specifically built or marketed as ocean boats
Author:
Updated:
Original:

The 28th ARC (Atlantic Rally for Cruisers) finished up in St. Lucia in mid December, and a stroll around the docks at the IGY Rodney Bay Marina yielded some interesting sights. Not least among them was the number of general-purpose production cruisers that weren’t specifically built or marketed as ocean boats, but are obviously well capable of transiting the Atlantic in good time and in good shape. Many—but by no means all—of these boats had been owner-modified in one way or another, and the nature of the mods was interesting. Most of the rigs looked standard, although some owners had added removable inner forestays for heavy-weather headsails. The most obvious differences showed up in the cockpit area, where extra gear deemed important for extended cruising—davits, solar panels, assorted antennae, safety equipment—ends up. Here’s a quick look at some of the add-ons and ancillaries.

Sprit On long downwind passages ease of sailhandling is paramount. Here’s a nice blend of traditional and modern—the sprit on this cruiser provides a perfect mounting point for an extending sprit for an A-sail.

Propane Most of the European boats sported composite gas cylinders, and it’s easy to see why. You can’t hang steel cylinders on your stern rail without having them rust away in no time, and you can see at glance how much propane is left in the tank.

Davits It’s a rare ocean-crosser that hasn’t had a stern arch bolted to it. As well as supporting the usual solar panels and wind generator, this one provides a convenient stowage point for a kayak.

Super Solar Lacking a cockpit arch, the skipper of this older cruiser had no choice but to mount his solar panels in the cockpit area. The lifeline-mounted one folds down under sail, while that one the transom can be rotated and swiveled to catch the sun’s rays. Note the homemade liferaft cage.

Power Generation In general, there were fewer wind generators than expected. Most boats relied on solar power, and several carried water generators like this towable unit.

Stern raft Most boats had liferafts mounted on the pushpit, which is a logical place for them—if a little unsightly. Note the lifebuoy and danbuoy combo—essential safety gear for all but coastal cruising.

Anchor Several boats had this good-looking and practical stern-anchor setup. Pull the pin and the anchor deploys. It’s ideal for bow-to Med mooring, but also has applications in many other cruising grounds where you can moor with a line to shore.

Raft arch Only recently have builders begun to provide dedicated liferaft stowage, so on most boats more than a few years old it’s difficult to find a mounting point that’s out of the way. The skipper of this boat has stashed his raft in his cockpit arch.

Related

Register-2048

Register of Circumnavigators Launched

Just in time for a fresh class of Vendée Globe sailors to attempt their circumnavigations, The International Association of Cape Horners (IACH) has taken on the responsibility of maintaining an official register of sailors who have completed solo circumnavigations by the Three ...read more

FPO skys0tlm8jlrpynehcpe_NEW

A Half-century of Cruising with SAIL

I cannot say I have been reading SAIL magazine since the very beginning, but I come pretty darned close. Sometime around 1974, when I was in high school, I began buying it every month at our local newsstand and saving every issue until I had great stacks of them, as carefully ...read more

B&G-Halo20+-side-facing

Gear: B&G HALO radar

B&G’s HALO series of radars now includes the HALO20+ and the HALO20, a pair of compact radomes expressly designed for use aboard smaller sailboats. The units measure 20in in diameter and weigh a mere 11lb. The HALO20+, in particular, delivers a full 360-degree sweep every ...read more

PICTON CASTLE under sail with stunsls WV7 compressed

Picton Castle Seeks Crew

The Picton Castle is set to begin its eighth circumnavigation this spring under the command of Captain Daniel Moreland. A professional crew of 12 will guide up to 40 trainees at a time as they learn about all aspects of sailing the bark, from steering to lookout, ...read more

DSC_0013

Ask Sail: Keel Attachments

Q: I have an early ‘70s Catalina 27. The keel bolts look pretty good. My question is, why not glass over the keel to bond to the hull rather than changing the bolts if, or when the bolts are too far gone? I haven’t seen anything on this, so could you discuss? Full-keels are ...read more

04-GOPR0511

Book Review: Sailing Into Oblivion

Sailing Into Oblivion by Jerome Rand $15.99, available through Amazon As refreshing and inspiring as Jerome Rand’s 2017-18 solo-circumnavigation may have been, his account of the voyage in the book Sailing Into Oblivion: The Solo Non-Stop Voyage of the Mighty Sparrow may be even ...read more

01-1970-Dec

50 Years of SAIL

Back in early 1970, Bernie Goldhirsh and the recently founded “Institute for the Advancement of Sailing,” publisher of an annual sailboat and gear guide, launched something called SAIL. A half-century later, a look back at the magazine’s first few years provides a glimpse into a ...read more

Photo-by-Adobe-Stockpics721-2048x

Webinar: Navigating Post-Dorian Abaco

On Thursday, October 22 at 6 pm ET, Navigare Yachting presents a webinar on what to expect from Abaco post-Dorian. The event will feature the authors of The Cruising Guide to Abaco, Steve Dodge and his sons Jon and Jeff.Hurricane Dorian hit Abaco in early September of 2019 and ...read more