Sailboat Rigging - Highly Strung Page 3

Time and again sailing has been revolutionized by the introduction of new fibers. Traditional wood hulls have been supplanted by glass fiber, Kevlar and carbon. Canvas sails have given way first to Dacron and then to laminated sails utilizing various high tech fibers. Running rigging today is entirely synthetic. And now stainless steel standing rigging is being replaced by fiber rigging,
Author:
Publish date:
saip_0909_02_z+sailboat_rigging_boatworks+terminals

EMERGENCY SHROUD KIT & SPLICING NUTS

Like many conservative cruisers, we generally carry a length of wire rigging as long as the longest stay on the boat, together with a collection of end fittings that will enable us to replace any stay or shroud should it fail. The wire ends up at the bottom of a locker, where it sits year after year.

Colligo Marine (www.colligomarine.com) has come up with an ingenious emergency kit that includes a 53-foot length of 7mm Dynex Dux with a lashing eye spliced into one end. Another lashing eye is loose in the kit. In the event of a stay or shroud failure, the line is cut to an appropriate length and the loose eye is spliced in place (detailed instructions are provided). The two eyes are lashed to the mast and at deck level. The kit is recommended for replacing standing rigging up to 1/4 inch in diameter, although there is no reason why the approach cannot be expanded to include larger pieces of rigging. The one drawback is that it's not easy for first-time users to splice in the second eye.

Another clever invention is the "splicing nut" (www.splicingnut.com). This is a two-part device. One half is slid up a length of braided line. The tail of the line is wrapped around the second part and then the two parts are screwed together to create a "spliced" eye in the end of the line. According to the website, "Anyone who can screw in a light bulb can splice a braided line." This, it seems to me, might be the best way to splice the second eye into a Colligo emergency shroud. Unfortunately, Steve Brennan at InoDesign, inventor of the splicing nut, specifically recommends it not be used in standing rigging. However, if I was in an emergency and worried about the mast coming down, I might give it a try—after all, there’d be little to lose. Once the emergency was passed, I could take the time to make a proper splice. - N.C

Related

mcarthy-and-mouse

Experience: McCarthy and the Mouse

Sitting at the helm in a light breeze, my arms crusted with a fine rime of salt, my skin so dry I’d lost my fingerprints, I heard a clatter and a curse from below. There were only three of us a thousand miles from shore and only one on watch at a time. Usually, the off watch lay ...read more

2018-giftGuide

2018 Holiday Gift Guide

Brass Yacht Lamp Does someone on your gift list spend the whole winter missing the warm days on the water? Let them bring a little bit of nautical atmosphere home with this new lamp from Weems & Plath. The glass enclosure means the flame cannot be blown out even by ...read more

image001

Opinion: On Not Giving Up Sailing

E.B. White was 64 when he wrote his now-famous essay “The Sea and the Wind That Blows,” which begins as a romantic paean to sailing and then drifts, as if spun around by a pessimistic eddy of thought, into a reflection on selling his boat. Does an aging sailor quit while he’s ...read more

TOTW_PromoSite

SAIL's Tip of the Week

Presented by Vetus-Maxwell. Got a tip? Send it to sailmail@sailmagazine.com A Helping Hand  This is a real-world solution, and I expect correction by my betters. However, anyone whose seacocks are modern ball valves rather than the grand old tapered cone variety may care to ...read more

1812-JeanneaueNewsVideo

Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 410

Designed by Marc Lombard, the Sun Odyssey 410 shares much in common with her older siblings including of course, the walk-around deck. Other features that set the 410 apart from other models being introduced this year include the 410’s “negative bow” shape allowing for a longer ...read more

shutterstock_698968441

Cruising: The Bahamas

“The ‘Explorer’ chartbooks. All three.” “An unlocked phone. But good luck with BTC.” “Spam. It’s ‘spensive there!” These were just a few suggestions we received from fellow sailors who had cruised the Bahamas when we asked how to best prepare for the trip. In fact, several ...read more

windsensor

Gear: B&G Wind Sensors

Sense the Wind B&G has launched a new line of wind sensors, including the WS320, a wireless system that is suitable for masts up to 80ft. Wireless wind sensor technology has been hit-and-miss, with some users reporting intermittent signal failure on tall rigs, but B&G, citing ...read more