How to Patch Hull Holes

Author:
Updated:
Original:
Dave works at fairing our hull patches after the epoxy has set and cured. We removed three through-hulls and filled all three holes as part of one project

Dave works at fairing our hull patches after the epoxy has set and cured. We removed three through-hulls and filled all three holes as part of one project

When a boat’s systems or interior are modified, you may need or want to glass over existing holes in the hull. One season when we hauled out in Trinidad, we decided to eliminate three through-hulls in our Creekmore 34, Eurisko. The holes were all different sizes, but we treated this as one project, performing each step on all three holes before continuing. In this way we used fewer materials and saved time and money.

We had already removed the plumbing from each seacock. Next we unscrewed the through-hull fittings from outside the hull, which proved to be no easy task. Lacking a through-hull wrench, my husband, Dave, used screwdrivers for leverage and finally managed to unscrew the bronze fittings without damaging them, causing only minimal damage to his knuckles in the process. Next he took out the seacock bolts. We had installed these using 3M’s 5200 adhesive sealant, so they had to be forcibly removed.

The diameter of each patch should be eight times the thickness of the hull laminate

The diameter of each patch should be eight times the thickness of the hull laminate

With the hardware out, we measured the thickness of the hull at each hole, which varied from 1in to 1¼in. Around each hole Dave drew a circle with a diameter eight times that of the hull thickness at each location. One circle ran on to the keel and was lopsided. Ideally, we would have marked similar circles on the inside of the hull as well, so as to create hourglass-shaped laminate patches for each hole, but we were living on the boat and this was not feasible.

We cleaned the inside of the hull around each hole and covered them with duct tape to keep fiberglass dust from getting inside the boat. Dave then cleaned the area around each hole on the outside with acetone to avoid grinding impurities into the laminate. After donning a Tyvek suit and cap, glasses and a respirator, he was ready to grind. Using 16- to 24-grit disks he ground out tapered declivities around each hole within the circles he had drawn.

[advertisement]
Next we pulled off the tape on the inside of the holes, cleaned up the dust that had crept through and taped them back shut. Dave once again washed the areas around the holes outside the hull with acetone, and the boat was ready for epoxy.

We elected to patch our holes with chopped strand mat and 12oz biaxial cloth, because that’s what was available. Depending on your hull laminate, you may or may not need to be more particular about the fiberglass fabric you use to create your patches. Using a compass and a Sharpie pen, Dave drew out a series of 16 circles on our glass fabric—eight on the mat and eight on the cloth—for each of our holes. Each series started with a circle a quarter-inch smaller than the ones drawn on the boat, followed by smaller-diamieter patches that decreased in size by half-inch increments.

The area of each patch should be ground out into a crater, or declivity, around the hole to be filled before any new laminate is applied

The area of each patch should be ground out into a crater, or declivity, around the hole to be filled before any new laminate is applied

All told we drew 48 circular patches, which we numbered to avoid confusion. The number of patches needed to fill a particular hole depends on the thickness of the hull. When in doubt, make more than you think necessary. After our circles were drawn and labeled, Dave cut them out with scissors and stacked them neatly in the order in which they were going to be laid down.
In order to work quickly and neatly, we decided I would mix epoxy and Dave would apply it. Using epoxy in Trinidad in the summer is a race, because the heat causes it to set quickly. Once we mixed it, even though we kept it in the shade, we had to work as quickly as possible, completing the work in one area and then moving immediately to the next.

Cutting out circular patches of cloth and chopped strand mat

Cutting out circular patches of cloth and chopped strand mat

Dave first used neat epoxy—straight, with no fillers—to wet out the area around a hole. After that he lightly troweled colloidal silica and epoxy, thickened to mayonnaise consistency, over the entire area. Then he wet out each circle with neat epoxy before applying it to the hull. The largest mat circle went down first, followed by the equivalent size cloth circle, and so on, alternating layers of mat and cloth. The mat builds bulk in the laminate, while the cloth provides structural strength.

Dave continued wetting smaller circles of fabric, and applied them one at a time. Between layers he used a roller to squeeze out any air pockets that might have formed. We found it was necessary to leave out a few circles of fabric on some holes so as to create a flush surface. Once all the layers were down, Dave applied more silica-thickened epoxy to smooth out the area. Next he placed a layer of “peel-ply” plastic over the patch to keep it from sagging and to ensure the surface would be fair once it cured. Any polyethylene plastic will work for this; we used a Budget Marine shopping bag.

e air bubbles out of the fresh laminate we created

e air bubbles out of the fresh laminate we created

Dave then squeegeed out the patch to fair it with the hull and cut away the edges of the peel-ply so that it would not pull it away from the hull. As epoxy cures it generates a lot of heat, which causes the peel-ply to bubble. This is usually not a problem, but any time a large amount of epoxy is curing it should be watched closely. We removed the peel-ply once the epoxy was fully cured. How long this takes depends on the ambient temperature and what hardener you used. Obviously, we always use a slow hardener in the tropics.

[advertisement]
Once our patches cured, Dave ground down any high spots and used epoxy thickened with colloidal silica to the consistency of peanut butter to fill in any low ones. He filled and sanded this way until he was satisfied that the hull was as fair as he could make it. We chose colloidal silica because it does not run on a vertical surface and because it does not absorb water.

We stuck bits of polyethylene plastic over the patches as they cured to keep the epoxy from sagging, then peeled them off after the epoxy had cured

We stuck bits of polyethylene plastic over the patches as they cured to keep the epoxy from sagging, then peeled them off after the epoxy had cured

After waiting for the last layer of epoxy to cure, we washed our patches with freshwater to remove any amines (a waxy by-product of the curing process), which can prevent primer and paint from adhering correctly. Next we washed the patches in acetone, then primed and painted the bottom. When we were done, the patches had completely disappeared, along with the three through-hull holes we didn’t need anymore.

Eurisko good as new

Eurisko, good as new

Cruiser Connie McBride is the author of Simply Sailing and Eurisko Sails West: A Year in Panama, available at amazon.com

Resources

West System, westsystem.com

Clark Craft, clarkcraft.com

Epiglass (Interlux), yachtpaint.com

Glen-L Marine Designs, glen-l.com

MAS Epoxies, masepoxies.com

Photos by Connie McBride

Related

210115-AC36

Prada Cup: Brits Take First Two Races

Who saw that coming? After getting skunked in December, INEOS Team UK has swept the first two races in the Prada Cup elimination series of the 36th America’s Cup  Racing took place on racecourse “C,” sheltered between Auckland’s North Head and Bastion Point to take advantage of ...read more

ac-2048x

Hutchinson: 36th America’s Cup will be a Close On

On the eve of the Prada Cup challenger series, the official start of the 36th America’s Cup, New York Yacht Club American Magic skipper Terry Hutchinson says it’s anyone’s game. "As we've seen in the last week, everyone's gotten faster," said Hutchinson said at the event’s ...read more

Episode1_Thumbnail4_00000_00000_00000_00000

Sailing Docuseries Released Online

Endless Media's Reaching Reality is the story of three friends, a 24-foot sailboat and 1,200 miles. With candor and humor, this series proves that you don't need to be an expert or a millionaire to cast off on the journey of a lifetime. Produced by Emmy-award winner Barry ...read more

01-LEAD-nder-sail-3

Prepping for a Transatlantic

Growing up on the coast of northern England, I dreamed about crossing oceans on my own boat. Like most of us, though, education, a family and a career took precedence, and before I knew it, we had mortgages, young children and endless work obligations. We also became landlocked, ...read more

210111-Vendee

Vendée Update: Josche Forced to Abandon

A week ago, the canting keel on Isabelle Jocshe's IMOCA 60, MACSF, failed. She managed a jury rig with a replacement ram, which held the keel centerline and allowed her to keep sailing, but with a major hit to her speed potential. Jocshe had been in 8th at the time and remained ...read more

rudder

Vendee Update: Emergency Rudder Replacement

A devastated Hare talks about the breakage Pip Hare (Medallia) is back in the game after an emergency rudder repair deep in the Southern Ocean. “Every part of my body aches. I have bloody knuckles on every finger, bruises all down my legs and muscles I didn't know I had that ...read more

Oracle-RBYACFEVD3_2870

PRADA Cup Pairings Announced

The schedule for the PRADA Cup has been revealed as a multitiered extravaganza featuring over a month of racing, stretching from January 15 through February 22. First, the three teams—American Magic, INEOS Team UK and Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli—will face off in a 12-race, six-day ...read more

01-LEAD-Opener-ETNZ1_-106_silo

The 36th America's Cup

A Superbowl is a Superbowl, and a World Series is a World Series. Sure, the names of the players and the teams change from year-to-year, but otherwise, the game pretty much remains the same. Not so the America’s Cup. Still, in many ways a hot mess left over from the days of Queen ...read more