Skip to main content

Boaters University's Marine Diesel Maintenance Course Series

  • Author:
  • Updated:
    Original:
boatersuniv

Soundings magazine and Active Interest Media are launching the first in a series of online boating education courses. Beginning in July, Boaters University will launch its first course “Maintaining and Troubleshooting Marine Diesel Engines.”

Early-bird registration is available now for the course, offering a $50 discount now through July 15. Use the special coupon code EARLYBIRD on the Boaters University website at www.boatersuniversity.com

The diesel engine is the beating heart of your vessel, whether you cruise under power or sail. Arguably, a good running engine is your most important single piece of safety gear. Diesel engines are economical, long-lived and reliable, yet there are a number of ways in which they can fail. This seeming contradiction brings us to the distinction that has shaped the “Online Marine Diesel Maintenance & Troubleshooting” course.

The internal workings of a diesel engine rarely fail—pistons, valves, shafts—and even if they were to fail, there is almost nothing boat owner could do about it except to call a repair shop. That’s why this course focuses solely on components that are 1) likely to go wrong and 2) repairable or preventable by a boat owner. Course segments address how to troubleshoot fuel, electrical, cooling and corrosion issues, etc., and describe how savvy maintenance can prevent these ancillary components from failing in the first place.

The course is about being independent. It is designed to impart the mechanical know-how that participants need to venture past the sight of land or to destinations beyond the range of SeaTow. And even if you intend to do your boating close to home and plan to hire technicians for maintenance and repairs, this course has value.

While most marine professionals are honest and competent, occasionally you may find yourself dealing with an exception. The 11 segments of this course will impart enough knowledge to ask your mechanic the right questions and evaluate the answers.

In short, “Online Marine Diesel Maintenance & Troubleshooting” is a twofold self-defense course. It imparts the knowledge to deal with the problems most likely to occur underway and to detect misinformation in the repair marketplace. This course may very well pay for itself many times over.

Online Marine Diesel Maintenance & Troubleshooting

1. Alternators: How they work and what to do if they stop working.

2. Belts: Types of belts. How to detect wear and make adjustments.

3. Bleeding the engine: Demonstration of the manual process for removing air from the fuel system after stalling or changing filters on older diesel engines.

4. Changing Filters: The right way to replace fuel and oil filters.

5. Changing Impellers: The process for replacing the wear part of a raw water pump.

6. Cooling System: How it works and maintenance to keep it working.

7. Fuel system: Good fuel is crucial. How to prevent fuel delivery failures.

8. Power Train: Paying regular attention to the hardware between the engine and the propeller can prevent expensive problems.

9. Shaft Seals: There are three types, each with its own advantages and disadvantages.

10. Taking Engine Temperatures: A simple tool and a regimen of routine can detect problems early on.

11. What To Do When Your Engine Won’t Start: Simple procedures to get you underway again.

Stay in the know with the Boaters University newsletter! New courses, instructor profiles, updates and more!

Click here to sign up!

June 2017

Related

00LEAD-Thomas-on-%22Melody%22-2004

The Extraordinary Life and Mysterious Disappearance of Thomas Thor Tangvald

The first boat Thomas Tangvald ever owned was just 22 feet long. She was an odd craft, a narrow plywood scow with a flat bottom, leeboards on either side, and square ends—little more than a daysailer with a rotting deck and tiny cabinhouse tacked on. Thomas paid just $200 for ...read more

VIPCAshowbynight

USVI Charter Yacht Show Showcases a Flourishing Industry

As the U.S. Virgin Islands continues to attract sailors seeking to charter and explore the pristine territory on their own, the immense growth and expanded options for a crewed yacht or term charters have exploded here over the past five years. Last week, the USVI Charter ...read more

Screen-Shot-2022-11-21-at-9.48.33-AM

Personal Locator Beacon Wins Top Design Award

The Ocean Signal RescueME PLB3 AIS Personal Locator took top honors at the 2022 DAME Design Awards, while Aceleron Essential, a cobalt-free lithium-iron phosphate battery with replaceable and upgradeable parts, won the first DAME Environmental Design Award. Announced each year ...read more

tracker

EPIRB in the Golden Globe Race

Tapio Lehtinen’s boat sank early this morning southeast of South Africa while racing the Golden Globe Race, a faithfully low-tech reproduction of the 1968 Sunday Times Golden Globe. The boat went down quickly and stern-first according to the skipper’s emergency transmissions. ...read more

99640-victoire-de-charles-caudrelier-a-bord-du-maxi-edmond-de-rothschild-r-1200-900

Victory, Tragedy in the Route du Rhum

The 2022 Route du Rhum was a highly anticipated event in the ocean racing calendar, but few could have predicted exactly how challenging, dramatic, and tragic it would ultimately prove. French yachtsman Charles Caudrelier took home gold aboard the Ultim maxi trimaran Maxi Edmond ...read more

DSC_1879

Boat Review: Lyman-Morse LM46

Lyman-Morse has been building fine yachts in Thomaston, Maine, ever since Cabot Lyman first joined forces with Roger Morse back in 1978. With experience creating and modifying boats built of various materials, backed by its own in-house fabrication facility, the firm has ...read more

01-LEAD-SPICA-Forest_3

Know-how: All-new Battery Tech

Until very recently, the batteries in sailboats used some form of lead-acid chemistry to store energy. Different manufacturers used different techniques and materials, but in the end, the chemistry and the process by which the batteries charge and discharge electricity remained ...read more

01-LEAD-Bill-Sailing2

At the Helm: When Things Go Sideways

I don’t like sea stories. My number one goal on every passage is to get the crew back in one piece. My number two goal is to get the boat back in one piece as well. If I can’t do both, I’ll take the former. Do this long enough, though, and things are going to happen, no matter ...read more