Three Hulls on the Road Page 2 - Sail Magazine

Three Hulls on the Road Page 2

To Tony Smith, the word "retirement" doesn't have quite the same connotation it might have for less energetic people. There'll be no pottering around in the garden for this longtime boatbuilder and designer. Instead, Tony and his wife Sue are heading for the Pacific Northwest, towing a 28ft Telstar trimaran that's been modified for an unusual cruise.For nearly 30 years Tony owned
Author:
Publish date:

The forepeak is given over to toilet, shower and stowage, but a comfortable double berth can be formed in the saloon by shuffling a few cushions around. During the day there is ample space for two people to stretch out on the settees and admire the scenery through the portlights. On deck, a full cockpit enclosure can be rigged to keep warmth in and mosquitoes out, thus much enlarging the living area.

Having seen how the Smiths so easily launched and rigged the Telstar, using an electric winch handle to crank up the 35ft mast on its clever (and safe) system of A-frames that make light of a heavy load, I was left to reflect on the virtues of a folding trimaran as a trailerable cruiser. From its maximum of 18ft, the Telstar’s beam shrinks to a trailer-legal 8ft 6in. The combination of stability under sail and speed under power is hard to beat. So is the fact that one senior citizen (sorry, Tony) can step and unstep the mast by himself.

telstar.int3
telstar.int4


At first sight the interior looks like that of a standard Telstar (above left). Tony reworked it to include a water heater and shower in the forepeak (above right). He also added a water maker (below left) and an electric single drawer fridge (below right).

telstar.int5
telstar.int6


Of course, as any sailor knows, talking about spending long periods of time on a small boat is one thing; actually doing it is quite another. When the reality of close-quarters life intrudes on the romance of the sailing life, the consequences can be ugly. That’s why Tony and Sue took a trial run up the East Coast last summer, both to see how the boat worked and how they themselves would cope. Their departure coincided with a four-day nor’easter that dumped torrential rain on them from Baltimore to Boston, and instead of sampling the joys of Cape Ann, they spent the first few days of their vacation glaring out at the rain from the shelter of a hotel.

The thought of being trapped on board during such a deluge was far from pleasant, but as is the way with sailing, the bad memories disappeared when the sun reappeared. They spent a glorious few days cruising Cape Cod Bay; long enough to confirm the modified Telstar’s suitability for their West Coast plans. Glacier Bay, here they come…rain or shine.

Related

daviscards

Davis Instruments: Quick Reference Cards

CHECK THESEIf you’re sailing with new crew this summer or your kids have suddenly and inexplicably started to look up from their phones and take an interest in the finer points of cruising, these Quick Reference Cards from Davis are a great way to further their boating education. ...read more

01-rbir18-596

Another Epic Round Britain Race

There are basically two kinds of offshore sailboat races out there: those that take place annually, like the Fastnet and Chicago-to-Mackinac races; and those that take place every other year, like the Transpac and Newport-Bermuda race, in part so the competitors have sufficient ...read more

01b_WALKING-KEDGE-OUT-cmykpromo

Getting More Use From Kedge Anchors

If you are cruising, you need at least two anchors on board for the simple reason that you must have a backup. Imagine having to slip your anchor on a stormy night with other boats dragging down on yours, or having your rope rode severed by some unseen underwater obstacle, ...read more

SailAwayCharter

How-to: Navigating on a Bareboat Charter

So you graduated from navigation class where you practiced dead reckoning, doubling the angle on the bow and maybe even celestial nav, and you now feel well prepared for your first charter trip. Well, you won’t be doing any of that on vacation—not past the first day, anyway.Most ...read more

04-Turtle-rescue

Turtle Rescue in the Vic-Maui

Strange and often wonderful things can happen in the course of an offshore sailboat race, and one of the strangest and most wonderful things we’ve heard of recently took place during the 2,300-mile 2018 Vic-Maui race, from Victoria, British Columbia, to Lahaina, Hawaii.It ...read more

dorcap-open-blue

ATN Inc: Dorcap

COOL SLEEPYou’re fast asleep in a snug anchorage, forehatch open to catch the breeze, when you’re rudely awakened by a sneaky rain squall. Now you’re not only awake and wet, you’re sweltering with the hatch closed. Sucks, right? That’s why ATN came up with the Dorcap, an ...read more

HIGH-RES-29312-Tahiti-GSP

Ask Sail: Who has the right-of-way

WHO HAS RIGHT-OF-WAY?Q: I sail in Narragansett Bay, which is a relatively narrow body of water that has upwind boats generally going south and downwind boats generally going north. When sailboats are racing, the starboard tack boat has the right-of-way over the port tack boat, so ...read more