Three Hulls on the Road Page 2

To Tony Smith, the word "retirement" doesn't have quite the same connotation it might have for less energetic people. There'll be no pottering around in the garden for this longtime boatbuilder and designer. Instead, Tony and his wife Sue are heading for the Pacific Northwest, towing a 28ft Telstar trimaran that's been modified for an unusual cruise.For nearly 30 years Tony owned
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
0

The forepeak is given over to toilet, shower and stowage, but a comfortable double berth can be formed in the saloon by shuffling a few cushions around. During the day there is ample space for two people to stretch out on the settees and admire the scenery through the portlights. On deck, a full cockpit enclosure can be rigged to keep warmth in and mosquitoes out, thus much enlarging the living area.

Having seen how the Smiths so easily launched and rigged the Telstar, using an electric winch handle to crank up the 35ft mast on its clever (and safe) system of A-frames that make light of a heavy load, I was left to reflect on the virtues of a folding trimaran as a trailerable cruiser. From its maximum of 18ft, the Telstar’s beam shrinks to a trailer-legal 8ft 6in. The combination of stability under sail and speed under power is hard to beat. So is the fact that one senior citizen (sorry, Tony) can step and unstep the mast by himself.

telstar.int3
telstar.int4


At first sight the interior looks like that of a standard Telstar (above left). Tony reworked it to include a water heater and shower in the forepeak (above right). He also added a water maker (below left) and an electric single drawer fridge (below right).

telstar.int5
telstar.int6


Of course, as any sailor knows, talking about spending long periods of time on a small boat is one thing; actually doing it is quite another. When the reality of close-quarters life intrudes on the romance of the sailing life, the consequences can be ugly. That’s why Tony and Sue took a trial run up the East Coast last summer, both to see how the boat worked and how they themselves would cope. Their departure coincided with a four-day nor’easter that dumped torrential rain on them from Baltimore to Boston, and instead of sampling the joys of Cape Ann, they spent the first few days of their vacation glaring out at the rain from the shelter of a hotel.

The thought of being trapped on board during such a deluge was far from pleasant, but as is the way with sailing, the bad memories disappeared when the sun reappeared. They spent a glorious few days cruising Cape Cod Bay; long enough to confirm the modified Telstar’s suitability for their West Coast plans. Glacier Bay, here they come…rain or shine.

Related

GG17-SAONA47-DX0796

Boat Review: Fountaine Pajot Saona 47

Here’s a riddle: What is less than 50ft long, has two hulls, three big cabins and four decks? Answer: The Fountaine Pajot Saona 47. In fact, it may even be five levels if you count the large engine rooms. This boat is a “space craft” in every sense of the word.DESIGN & ...read more

RichardBennettMIDNIGHT-RAMBLER3249x202

Storm Sails: Do you Need Them?

Many sailors embarking on ocean passages will take along the obligatory storm jib and trysail, with the vague idea that they may come in handy. Few sailors, however, have a real understanding of how and when to set them.It doesn’t help matters when we hear from seasoned sailors ...read more

IntheWater(1)

Boaters University Unveils Rescue Course

Boaters University has just announced its latest online course, Safety & Rescue at Sea, taught by Mario Vittone, whose name you might recognize from the pages of our sister publication, Soundings Magazine and his Lifelines blog.Mario Vittone is a retired U.S. Coast Guard rescue ...read more

IMG_20170920_132819

How to: Installing New Electronics

I had been sailing my Tayana 42, Eclipse, for a few years without any installed electronics on board. I’d gone pretty far up and down the New England and Mid-Atlantic coasts with paper charts, the Navionics app on my Android phone, a hand-bearing compass and the ship’s compass. ...read more

02-Douglas-Adkins---Coriolis---Orcas-Island-KevinLightPhoto

A Phoenix-like Concordia

Cutting a fine wake on the cobalt-blue waters of West Sound on Orcas Island, Coriolis sparkles like a diamond. Her lovely silhouette is offset by emerald forests that frame the ocean, within spitting distance of the border with Canada. Seen up close, this Concordia yawl is a ...read more

IMG_1051

The Latest Boat Trends from Dusseldorf

The world’s biggest boat and watersports show, held in Düsseldorf on the banks of Germany’s Rhine River each January, is the place to scope out emerging trends in the boat design and building.What would be the new trends for 2018 and beyond? Hint—sophisticated electronics figure ...read more

TOTW_PromoSite

SAIL's Tip of the Week

Presented by Vetus-Maxwell.Got a tip? Send it to sailmail@sailmagazine.comGood ConnectionsI wish I’d had a dollar for every time I’ve cobbled together an electrical fitting with a “that’s good enough” shrug. An old shipwright once taught me that “good enough is not good enough” ...read more

tides2

Gear Test: Tides Marine Sailtrack

Gravity is an important force at work on a sailboat. It keeps the boat upright, it makes the anchor drop to the bottom, and it makes the mainsail slide neatly down the mast to be flaked and put away at the end of the day… until it doesn’t.In the case of dropping the mainsail, the ...read more