PxPixel
Prepare Sushi on Board - Sail Magazine

Prepare Sushi on Board

Anchored off a fishing village on the Pacific coast of Mexico’s Baja peninsula, my daughters, Eleanor (8) and Frances (6), sat at the dinette, manipulating small piles of found objects and plastic pieces into spiral shapes as part of some kid of game.
Author:
Publish date:

Anchored off a fishing village on the Pacific coast of Mexico’s Baja peninsula, my daughters, Eleanor (8) and Frances (6), sat at the dinette, manipulating small piles of found objects and plastic pieces into spiral shapes as part of some kid of game.

platedSushi

“What’s this?” I asked, picking one up and accidentally disturbing an entire place setting with my big fingers.

“Da-ad!” they both exclaimed, “It’s sushi, please put it back.”

“Do you guys know that when I was your age,” I said, pausing for emphasis, certain I was about to rock their world, “…we never ate sushi.”

 Dinner is served!

Dinner is served!

Both of them looked up at the mention of their favorite food, “Because you didn’t like it, or they hadn’t invented it?” Eleanor asked.

I explained how fewer people traveled then, how cultural influences weren’t as widespread, and that sushi hadn’t yet become popular in the United States.

“I feel bad for you Dad,” said Eleanor.

“Yeah, me too,” said Frances. “Can we have sushi tonight?”

Aboard Del Viento, our 1978 Fuji 40, sushi rolls are part of our regular dinner menu, even when anchored hundreds of miles from the nearest sushi bar. It’s healthy, easy to prepare, and the essential ingredients are non-perishable and can be stowed easily until the fresh ingredients are readily available. When that reel on the stern begins to sing, why not start the rice cooking? Making sushi rolls is easier than you might think. 

INGREDIENTS:

Fillings:

Short-grained rice, white or brown. I use ½ cup cooked rice per roll.

Avocado (thinly sliced)

Rice vinegar

Cucumber (julienned)

Nori

Carrot (julienned)

Sugar

Yam (sautéd or roasted)

Salt

Green onion (thinly sliced)

Soy sauce

Cream cheese

Wasabi

Extra firm tofu (baked)

Pickled ginger

Sashimi (fresh tuna, mahi-mahi, or salmon)

Seasame seeds

Crab (cooked, real or imitation) 

PREPARATION

1. Prepare sushi rice. Rinse the rice until water is clear, then cook according to instructions. While rice is cooking, combine 1/3 cups rice vinegar, 2T sugar and 1t salt in a small bowl; whisk until dissolved (for 4 cups cooked rice; adjust for different amounts). When rice is finished, transfer to large bowl; pour vinegar mixture over rice and fluff with a fork.

2. Mix wasabi powder with water per the instructions and set aside (the longer it sits, the more flavor develops)

3. Prep desired fillings 

CONSTRUCTION

rollingSushi

1. Lay a bamboo mat on a cutting board or flat surface, then place a sheet of nori on it, shiny side down. Pour ?up rice vinegar into a bowl and place in-reach, along with the prepared sushi rice and fillings. 

2. Wet your hands with rice vinegar and grab a small handful of rice. The vinegar on your hands will help handle the sticky rice. Spread the rice onto the nori evenly in a thin layer, leaving a 1in strip of bare nori along the top edge.

3. About two inches from the bottom, lay desired filling across the rice in a 1in row that stretches the length of the nori.

4. Roll the sushi. Begin by rolling the bottom of the rice-covered nori over the top of the fillings, using the bamboo mat as a mold. Tuck the roll snugly, and shift it up the bamboo mat as you roll toward the edge of the nori. Just before you reach the top, wipe a bit of rice vinegar on the exposed nori. Then finish rolling.

5. Use a sharp knife to cut the roll into pieces.

6. Repeat until the rice is gone.

7. Invite your crew to dig in, using soy sauce, pickled ginger, wasabi and sesame seeds to taste.

If you need more reasons, besides good sushi, to become a fishing sailor read Robert Bateman’s story How (and why) to become a Fishing Sailor.

Related

Josie-helm-2

Chartering the U.S. and Spanish Virgins

Flying into Tortola in the British Virgin Islands one December morning, three months after Hurricane Irma, I felt like a war correspondent dispatched to the battlefront rather than a sailing magazine writer on an assignment to go cruising.As my LIAT plane descended toward Beef ...read more

Crew-North-27M004

Weather Gear for Inshore Sailing

Just because you’re not planning on braving the Southern Ocean this summer doesn’t mean that you won’t have some dicey days out on the water. If you haven’t got the right gear, a little rain or humidity can make things miserable. As with all safety equipment, “it’s always better ...read more

atlantic-cup-trailer

2018 Atlantic Cup Video Mini-Series

Atlantic Cup 2018: TrailerThis past spring, SAIL magazine was on-hand to document the 2018 Atlantic Cup, a two-week-long Class 40 regatta spanning the U.S. East Coast and one of the toughest events in all of North America. The preview above will give you a taste of the four-video ...read more

3DiNordac_webheader

3Di NORDAC: One Year In

One year ago this month, North Sails launched a cruising revolution with the introduction of 3Di NORDAC. The product promised to deliver a better cruising experience for a market that had not seen true product innovation in over 60 years. Today we’re celebrating the team that ...read more

HB96k_EP

Sea Eagle’s HB96 inflatable SUP

What SUP?Dinghies and kayaks are all very well, but there’s nothing like a stand-up paddleboard for exploring interesting new shorelines while giving you a good workout. Sea Eagle’s HB96 inflatable SUP makes a fine addition to your boat’s armory of anchorage toys, either on its ...read more

DSC_0031-43

Charting the USVI and Spanish Virgins

When my friends and I booked a one-way bareboat charter with Sail Caribe, starting in the U.S. Virgin Islands and finishing in Puerto Rico, we were a little nervous about what we would find in the aftermath of hurricanes Irma and Maria—even seven months later.When our plane ...read more

SailRepairKit

Know How: Sail Repair Kit

Despite your best efforts, there will inevitably be times when your sail gets damaged while at sea and needs to be repaired. First, no matter what the job, you will need to do a quick damage assessment, a task that requires a flat wooden surface, sharp scissors and a helping ...read more

01-061018ROAC-8149

Coming of Age at the Atlantic Cup

Midway through the final race of the inshore portion of the 2018 Atlantic Cup, the three boats in the lead—Mike Dreese’s Toothface 2, Mike Hennessy’s Dragon and Oakcliff Racing, representing the Long Island Sound-based sailing school of the same name—suddenly broke free from the ...read more

01_silken_2018-03-08-0052

North U’s Regatta Experience Program

“Want to check the keel?” North U Coach Geoff Becker calls to me from back by the transom. We’ve just suffered our worst finish in the regatta and are absolutely flying on our way back to shore, spinnaker up and heeling at an angle that feels like maybe we’re tempting fate. ...read more