Updated:
Original:

Paintings of Sailboats

Author:

With water covering nearly seventy-one percent of the earth’s surface, it is no surprise that people have been portraying the sea through marine art since prehistoric times. There are many marine artists who are keeping this tradition alive: here are six of them.

Crossed Paths. Image copyright of Steven Lush

Crossed Paths. Image copyright of Steven Lush

Steven Lush

Steven Lush

“Since I am mostly self-taught, I do not approach any of my subject matter from an established protocol. I am mostly interested in light and how it transforms that which it envelops. Whatever medium I choose, I lean toward the application of strong brush strokes saturated with color. I am constantly trying to evoke a mood rather than a realistic clarity by blending precision with freedom.” Having messed about on boats as a child and then graduated from the Merchant Marine Academy, Lush was naturally drawn to the maritime world for his art. He paints freighters, workboats, classics, modern raceboats with equal passion and attention to detail. His comprehension of how a certain brush stroke or color has the ability to evoke a feeling or emotion is evident in how he portrays seafaring so eloquently. Sometimes thoughtful, sometimes rushed, it’s as if his brush strokes speak the feelings of the people on board his boats. stevenlushart.com

Morning Ready to Sail. Image copyright of Alana Knuff

Morning Ready to Sail. Image copyright of Alana Knuff

“Deep hues quietly form shadows playing near subtle neutral grays. These offer the backdrop, the harmony with which vibrant and bright colors sing the melody. It is an enchanting song that I see—elusive and captivating. As an artist, one cannot refrain from trying to capture the moment and preserve the emotion it evokes. That is why I paint.” From her home in Charleston, South Carolina, Alana paints the sea like a conductor leading an orchestra. Her colors play together in harmony, guiding you through her work with lost and found edges. Beginning her career as an artist at the ripe age of five, she went on to embrace her analytical side, earning a degree in mathematics and working as a project manager. Her paintings are an exquisite balance of her creativity and practicality. alanaknuff.com

Alana Knuff

Alana Knuff

“The lure of foreign places, and the desire to see the world or the challenge of facing the dangers to be found at sea—all these sentiments are part of the romance of seafaring. And it is the romance of seafaring that often draws people to marine art.”

— The National Maritime Historical Society

Diamonds on the Water

Diamonds on the Water. Image copyright of John Barber

John Barber

John Barber

“From the beginning, I was into marine art, I think before I even realized it. As a young boy, my mother came in one morning to find me lying on the floor drawing a picture of a whale spouting water by a tropical island. She was surprised because I’d never seen the ocean at that early age.” Known as “the premier chronicler of Chesapeake life,”this nationally acclaimed artist’s paintings have a depth to them that not only depict his surroundings but also the stories happening inside of them. Barber’s use of light and texture, along with his distinct attention to detail ,bring his paintings to life and allow you step into the beauty of the eastern seaboard. johnbarberart.com

The Egret and the Heron. Image copyright of Val Sandell

The Egret and the Heron. Image copyright of Val Sandell

“I love painting water, I love painting sun hitting things, sun hitting sails, Plein air painting—dealing with what real life looks like, rather than a studio painting from a photographer.” Val does an exquisite job of expressing how she feels through what she calls “the language of paint.” In this language she speaks in a way that makes you feel as if you are standing there beside her taking in the beauty of nature at the same time. Her training in blending naturalistic and impressionistic styles is as evident as her appreciation for the outdoors. valartist.com

Val Sandell

Val Sandell

Into the Gulf Stream Chop. Image copyright of Donald Demers

Into the Gulf Stream Chop. Image copyright of Donald Demers

Donald Demers

Donald Demers

“I have had a deeply rooted attachment to the sea from the time I was a boy. It defied age, it broke the separation between past, present and future, and it actually almost puts me in an eternal time frame. And the emotions that are brought up by watching the repetition of the sea over and over and what it means—it’s life on the edge.” A passionate sailor, Don has crewed on a plethora of traditional boats ranging from schooners to square-riggers. His summers spent on the coast of Maine near Boothbay Harbor are evident in his work, as are the skills that he developed from his years at art school. You can feel the impact that the sea has had on him, his paintings allowing you to also embrace that eternal repetition. donalddemers.com

One Day at Bahia Honda. Image copyright of Priscilla Coote

One Day at Bahia Honda. Image copyright of Priscilla Coote

“I always found the sea and everything around it to have an edge that matched my feelings. It was a wonderful series of images to express what I felt inside. The iconography of the sea has the mixture of joy and pain or sorrow that matched my inner feelings.”
Growing up on the water, Priscilla was introduced to boats at an early age. With a desire to travel and use the knowledge she had, she continued seeking out opportunities onboard into her adulthood that would inspire her work. Not only do her bright colors and warm touch allow you to see her adventures, they let you share them. When admiring her work you’re left smelling salt water and feeling the breeze in your hair. pcoote.com

Priscilla Coote

Priscilla Coote

December 2016

Related

03-IMG_0590

Bill Tilman’s Simple Sailing

Like an ostrich on a bad day, I’m head-down in the lazarette of Nellie, my Beneteau First 42, dealing with the propane tank. My wife taps me on the shoulder, and I rise to see a pair of foiling catamarans accelerating onto their carbon-fiber wings. As the blood drains from my ...read more

01-LEAD-210801_PM_Tokyo20_22825_5540

Olympic Sailing: Where to Now?

It’s official, not only is the United States no longer an Olympic power when it comes to sailing, it’s fast beginnings look like an also-ran—albeit an also-ran with loads of potential. What other conclusion is there to draw from the fact that for the second time in three ...read more

244526945_394104495768313_1401658800642145082_n

Return of the Annapolis Boat Show

After a hiatus in 2020, the United States Boat Show in Annapolis, Maryland returned in full force last weekend. “Pent up demand” was the name of the game for visitors and exhibitors alike. Queues to get in each morning stretched around the block, and the docks were congested ...read more

Untitled-1

Sailing Hall of Fame Inducts Class of 2021

This weekend, the National Sailing Hall of Fame has inducted eleven new members to make up the class of 2021. “The remarkable achievements of this year’s class exemplify excellence and an unwavering dedication to our sport,” said National Sailing Hall of Fame president Gus ...read more

ed3b8ae9-b65d-2941-47ec-cd0277bfcbe8

Mirabaud Voting Open to the Public

Photos from the industry's top photographers are in, and the 12th annual Mirabaud Yacht Racing Image competition is underway. An international panel of judges has selected this year's 80 finalists, which have been published online. The panel will also select the winner of the ...read more

P1320232-copy

Annapolis’ Boat Show is Back

After a year off in 2020, the United States Boat Show in Annapolis is back. From the diminutive Areys Pond Cat 14 XFC to the massive Lagoon Sixty 5, many of the SAIL’s 2022 Best Boats Nominees are on display for the public to get a firsthand look at, and SAIL’s Best Boats panel ...read more

05-Squall-in-the-ITCZ

Close-Hauled to Hawaii

The saying “Nothing goes to windward like a 747,” is one of my favorites. I actually once took a 747 upwind, retracing my earlier downwind sailing route across the Pacific. I’ve also done a fair bit of ocean sailing to windward. The 747 was a lot more comfortable. But then ...read more

01-LEAD-IMG-2106

Refurbishing Shirley Rose: Part 3

If you missed the first installment, click here. The hull and deck of Shirley Rose had been repaired, but what kind of sailboat would she be without a sturdy rig? I was told she was ready to sail, and that the owner replaced the standing rigging a few years before. Shirley Rose ...read more