Blackened Turkey Breast

Total Time: 3 hours without briningPrep Time: 15 minutesBrine/Marinade Time: Brine: 1 hour for every pound, Refrigerate: 2 hoursGrill Time: 2 – 2 1/2 hoursServes: 6-10What You'll Need:3-5 lbs boneless turkey breastMelted butter or canola
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Total Time: 3 hours without brining

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Brine/Marinade Time: Brine: 1 hour for every pound, Refrigerate: 2 hours

Grill Time: 2 – 2 1/2 hours



Serves: 6-10




What You'll Need:


3-5 lbs boneless turkey breast

Melted butter or canola oil – enough to brush 2-3 times

Your favorite cajun or blackening spices – enough to rub the entire turkey.

1 onion (we prefer Vidalia if available) thinly sliced

Brine the turkey overnight if you prefer. Brining adds moisture and flavor and helps to keep turkey from drying out – soak 1 hour for every pound in a solution of salt/sugar and water (approx 1/2 C. salt to a half-gallon water – a freezer baggie makes a great container – fits easily on top of a boat refrigerator. Rinse complete inside and out to get rid of the salt solution. Loosen the skin by running your fingers underneath and brush the butter or oil over the breast, under the skin first then over. Rub all sides under the skin with spice and surround with sliced onion. Wrap in foil or plastic wrap and refrigerate 2 hours. Uncover, discard onions.

Grill uncovered until internal temperature reaches 170 to 175 degrees for the dark meat. Depending on your grill, this should take 1 1/2 -2 hours for 2-4 lbs; 2 to 2 1/2 hours for 4-5 lbs. We turn ours every 30 minutes and rebrush with butter – especially on the down side to keep the juices in. If you’re unsure whether it’s done, cut a small slit low – juices should run clear. If it appears to be cooking too quickly, turn down the heat or cover with foil. Some people like to put their turkeys in a metal pan on the grill to catch drippings, but we prefer to place it directly on the grates. Experiment to see which you prefer. Serve with all the holiday trimmings!

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