A Photographic Journey of Star Flyer

At 360 feet long and 220 feet tall, the barquentine clipper ship Star Flyer is a sight to behold under sail.It takes three officers and over two dozen crew to manage the sixteen sails aboard Star Flyer, one of the three clipper ships in the Star Clippers family. Here, the crew poses from the bowsprit while
Author:
Publish date:
boat3


At 360 feet long and 220 feet tall, the barquentine clipper ship Star Flyer is a sight to behold under sail.

boat5


It takes three officers and over two dozen crew to manage the sixteen sails aboard Star Flyer, one of the three clipper ships in the Star Clippers family. Here, the crew poses from the bowsprit while weighing anchor off the western coast of Costa Rica.

CREW2


Repair jobs on a ship this size require lots of crew coordination...

boat6


And a very powerful sewing machine.

CREW1



Throughout the week, Captain Jrgen Mller-Cyran offers lectures on the history of clipper ships and the America's Cup; passengers listen from the comfort of their lounge chairs.

CREW3


To honor the tradition of clipper ships, the cruise itinerary includes several chances to experience the ship as sailors may have experienced it 150 years ago. From climbing the rope ladder to the crow's nest...

LOB3


To navigating with a sextant...

lob4


To teaching knots and splices, the crew aims to provide a complete and genuine clipper ship experience.

LOB_1


Life on board Star Flyer is both fun and relaxing. Morning aerobics take on a new meaning as the "gym" floor rocks and rolls beneath you.

lob6


Throughout the day, there is plenty of time to chat with new friends and bask in the sun, surrounded by beautifully maintained teak decks and mahogany railings.

excur_2


Every morning, Star Flyer enters a new port and offers excursions ashore. In Costa Rica, you can waterski around the ship (above) zipline through the trees, or stroll the streets of Central America, rich with the brilliant colors of native architecture.

nature_2


Excursions also afford passengers a chance to see Central America's renowned flora and fauna.

food3


After a long day of sailing and sightseeing, there are few things more desirable than a delicious meal. Luckily, Star Flyer specializes in gourmet cuisine inspired by both local flavors and international dishes.

lob5


No day on Star Flyer is complete without evening entertainment, whether it's locals performing traditional dances, passengers competing in a talent show, or the entire ship dancing the night away.

These photos were taken on

Star Flyer

as she sailed the Pacific coast of Central America from Caldera, Costa Rica to San Juan, Nicaragua, and back again. For more information on Star Clippers cruises, click

here

.

Related

Nathan-Bates-San-Diego,-CA

SAIL 2018: Reader's Photographs

Are you out there sailing, cruising and living the sailing life? If so, we’d love to see it. Send your sailing photos to sailmail@sailmagazine.com And don’t forget to sign up for our free eNewsletter. Check back for updates! I took this shot from Cooper Island Beach Club as my ...read more

TOTW_PromoSite

SAIL's Tip of the Week

Presented by Vetus-Maxwell. Got a tip? Send it to sailmail@sailmagazine.com Fall in line In the days before GPS, the best trick outside the book for finding a harbor in dense fog went like this: if it’s surrounded by rocks, forget it; if not, in you go, but never try to hit it ...read more

190115-Mark-Slats-Golden-Globe-Race2048x

Photo-Finish in the Golden Globe Race 2018

With less than 1,700 miles to go to the finish in Les Sables d'Olonne, France, second-place Mark Slats of the Netherlands has cut another 393 miles out of the lead held by French sailor Jean-Luc Van Den Heede in the Golden Globe 2018 race.  Jean-Luc aboard the Rustler 36 Matmut ...read more

06-Heineken-1-R2018_1March_©LaurensMorel_LMA5965_p

Post-Irma Heineken Regatta

Even more than a year and half later, the scars from Hurricane Irma are still all too visible on the island of St. Maarten. But if Irma couldn’t prevent the famed Heineken from taking place in the winter of 2017, you can bet it’s not going to put a crimp in either the racing or ...read more

05-TRANSPAC_71417_SG_055268

The Transpac Prepares for No. 50

Because modern yachting is in many ways an invention of the early to mid 20th century, in recent years sailors have been celebrating any number of milestone anniversaries. Now it’s the biennial Transpac’s turn, as it prepares for its 50th race from Southern California (following ...read more

_theLapitaDesign

Catamaran Man: James Wharram

Next time you climb on board a Lagoon in the Caribbean or spy a Prout bobbing in the harbor, spare a thought for James Wharram. Though this somewhat froward Englishman won’t thank me for saying so, he is partly responsible for both—and indeed, all the other modern catamarans now ...read more

Radar

Ask SAIL: Radar Antenna Location

Q: I have a 40ft Pearson with a 24-mile radar antenna installed on the radar arch aft. I am concerned that I could be missing medium-range targets beyond eight to 10 miles away. Should I have the antenna moved to the mast, 10ft higher than where it is now? — Jack Crawford, ...read more