Win an Escape to St. Vincent

Yearning to get away this winter on a Caribbean charter? You still have a week to win SAIL’s Great Escape contest: a free weeklong charter in St. Vincent and the Grenadines with TMM Yacht Charters.
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Right around this time of year, I start to get antsy. My sunglasses feel neglected, my flip-flops begin to gather dust and my suitcase practically cringes at the plummeting temperatures. It’s time to go on charter.

If you’re plagued with the same addiction to sailing travel, there’s good news. You still have seven days to win a free weeklong charter in St. Vincent and the Grenadines with TMM Yacht Charters. To enter, click here and tell us your “Top 5 Reasons to Escape to St. Vincent and the Grenadines.”

For those of you who’ve never chartered there, St. Vincent and the Grenadines is one of the most eye-catching chartering grounds in the Caribbean. We wrote about it here and here.

And before long, we’ll have another sailor singing the praises of SVG. Reader Annie Poechlauer and her husband Kurt of Everett, WA, won the Great Escape Contest of 2011 and are currently prepping for their free charter this December. This will be the couple’s fist-ever charter and they’ll be sailing on board the Beneteau 362, La Paloma, with TMM Yacht Charters. “One of the things we’re most looking forward to is the water temperature.” says Annie. “We do all of our sailing in Northern waters here in Puget Sound and the San Juan Islands, where the water temperature hovers around 48 degrees.”

Annie and Kurt own a 28ft Catalina, Ottilie III, and keep her moored in Everett. Their favorite cruising spots include Sucia Island in the San Juans and, “a secret little anchorage in Port Susan between the mainland and Camano Island. No one else is ever there, so we have the eagles, herons, seals and an occasional gray whale all to ourselves.”

Here’s Annie’s contest-winning essay from last year:

What are Your Top 5 Reasons to escape to St. Vincent and the Grenadines?

Reason number one: To experience the almost hypnotizing lull of a long, steady tack in steady winds, with actual sunshine on my face and just one layer of clothing instead of my usual five or six layers...yes, I am a true northern waters sailor—happy but always cold!

Reason number two: To drop anchor after that mesmerizing sail, in a lazy, quiet bay, anticipating a simple yet satisfying meal with my best friend (who happens to be my husband of 30 years), and the peaceful evening to come, complete with the gentle lapping of waves against the hull, and a little further away, on the shore.

Reason number three: To immerse myself in the sunset, feeling my eyelids try to go down with the sun, but fighting it just long enough for the stars to emerge, because that really is the best hand-holding time to be had in the whole world.

Reason number four: To sneak up on the bow just before sunrise with a hot cup of coffee, and silently look out across the water and observe the miraculous world around me...and then to leap into the water after the sun is up, without the first thought after I hit the water being "I wonder if there is a functional AED on board?" (once again, northern waters syndrome).

Reason number five: To be able to witness and share in my husband's sheer joy and delight, who would be like a little boy on Christmas morning (complete with his pirate outfit) if he could spend a week sailing in fair winds, with the added bonus of that warm sunshine that keeps his wife from whining all day.

Enter this year's contest now!

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