Three New Performance Cruisers from Salona - Sail Magazine

Three New Performance Cruisers from Salona

The Croatia-built Salona range now has a new importer in the United States, who showed three boats at the Miami Strictly Sail show last month: a powerful-looking 44-foot sports cruiser, and a 38-footer and 33-footer along the same lines.  
Author:
Publish date:
 Already a proven race-winner, the Salona 38 also has excellent cruising credentials

Already a proven race-winner, the Salona 38 also has excellent cruising credentials

The Croatia-built Salona range now has a new importer in the United States, who showed three boats at the Miami Strictly Sail show last month: a powerful-looking 44-foot sports cruiser, and a 38-footer and 33-footer along the same lines.

I’ve had soft spot for this young company—it’s only 12 years old—since a brief sail on their 45 (forerunner of the 44) a few years ago. The European market is packed with high-quality performance cruisers, and it takes perseverance to break into that niche.

 The Salona 44 made its U.S. debut at the Miami Strictly Sail show in February

The Salona 44 made its U.S. debut at the Miami Strictly Sail show in February

Salona’s emphasis is on speed combined with precise handling, much like J/Boats but with more concessions to cruising comfort than most of the current J line. A comparison with bigger C&Cs or Denmark’s X-Yachts would not go astray. The boats are designed by veterans J&J Design, who also hail from Croatia and have many successful production designs to their name.

Each of these Salona models bristles with functional and clever little design features, such as transom seats that lift off to become passarelles for boarding, and a recessed mainsheet traveller that can be covered over while in port. The boats are strongly built, with vacuum-infused layups of triaxial cloth and vinylester resins and a stainless steel frame laminated into an inner strengthening grid to distribute keel and rig stresses. They are beefy boats, relying on generous sail area and sleek underwater lines for their speed.

 The removable cover for the recessed mainsheet track on the Salona 44 is an example of the nice detailing to be found on these boats

The removable cover for the recessed mainsheet track on the Salona 44 is an example of the nice detailing to be found on these boats

The 44 slots right into the sweet spot for cruisers of this ilk. She can carry a big racing crew, but at the same time a couple can easily handle her, as most sail controls are convenient to the helms. Cruisers will love the U-shaped galley and big nav station in the standard three-cabin, two-heads layout, with a spacious owner’s suite forward. Displacing a hair over 20,000lb and displaying a hull form that’s neither too beamy nor too shallow, the 44 is moderate in all respects, which indicates a seakindly disposition and predictable handling.

The Salona 38 on show at Miami had more of an edge to it. It’s also a J&J design but its keel has been optimized by hotshot IRC maven Jason Ker. In the old idiom it would be called a racer-cruiser, but these days the lines between racer and cruiser have blurred to the extent that boats like this perform both functions successfully. Take a peek belowdecks and you know this is no stripped-out racer, though; there is an abundance of attractive teak trim, a generous amount of stowage space and comfortable accommodations for a family of six. 

 The perky-looking Salona 33 promises to be fast and nimble

The perky-looking Salona 33 promises to be fast and nimble

The newest model at Miami was the Salona 33, introduced last year. Complete with retracting sprit and a deck layout that would suit a savvy singlehander as well as a full racing crew, this is more of an obvious race toy than either of its sisters. Down below, a simple but functional layout, sparsely trimmed in teak, will serve perfectly well for weekend or longer cruises with a couple or a young family. It looks like a lot of fun. Hopefully it will do well; there is no obvious direct competitor in this size range, save the slightly shorter J/97.

There have been other attempts to bring Salonas into the U.S., but with a determined importer and a strong, distinctive model range, this Croatian company ought to meet with success. 

Related

01b_WALKING-KEDGE-OUT-cmykpromo

Getting More Use From Kedge Anchors

If you are cruising, you need at least two anchors on board for the simple reason that you must have a backup. Imagine having to slip your anchor on a stormy night with other boats dragging down on yours, or having your rope rode severed by some unseen underwater obstacle, ...read more

SailAwayCharter

How-to: Navigating on a Bareboat Charter

So you graduated from navigation class where you practiced dead reckoning, doubling the angle on the bow and maybe even celestial nav, and you now feel well prepared for your first charter trip. Well, you won’t be doing any of that on vacation—not past the first day, anyway.Most ...read more

04-Turtle-rescue

Turtle Rescue in the Vic-Maui

Strange and often wonderful things can happen in the course of an offshore sailboat race, and one of the strangest and most wonderful things we’ve heard of recently took place during the 2,300-mile 2018 Vic-Maui race, from Victoria, British Columbia, to Lahaina, Hawaii.It ...read more

dorcap-open-blue

ATN Inc: Dorcap

COOL SLEEPYou’re fast asleep in a snug anchorage, forehatch open to catch the breeze, when you’re rudely awakened by a sneaky rain squall. Now you’re not only awake and wet, you’re sweltering with the hatch closed. Sucks, right? That’s why ATN came up with the Dorcap, an ...read more

HIGH-RES-29312-Tahiti-GSP

Ask Sail: Who has the right-of-way

WHO HAS RIGHT-OF-WAY?Q: I sail in Narragansett Bay, which is a relatively narrow body of water that has upwind boats generally going south and downwind boats generally going north. When sailboats are racing, the starboard tack boat has the right-of-way over the port tack boat, so ...read more

albinheaters

Albin Pump Marine: Marine Water Heaters

IN HOT WATERSweden’s Albin Pump Marine has introduced its line of marine water heaters to the United States. Complete with 130V or 230V AC electric elements, the heaters can be plumbed into the engine cooling system. They feature ceramic-lined cylindrical tanks in 5, 8, 12 and ...read more

03-squalls4

Squall Strategies

Our first encounter with a big squall was sailing from San Diego to Ensenada, Mexico. We left at 0200 to ensure we’d get into Ensenada before our 1300 haulout time. The National Weather Service had forecast consistent 15-20 knot winds from the northwest, which was perfect for the ...read more