SAIL's Best Boats 2014: Lagoon 39 - Sail Magazine

SAIL's Best Boats 2014: Lagoon 39

The Lagoon 39 was a favorite among the SAIL judges for a variety of reasons, including its innovative design, sound construction, good systems and fine sailing qualities, all topped off by the fact of its simply being a handsome vessel.
Author:
Publish date:

The Lagoon 39 was a favorite among the SAIL judges for a variety of reasons, including its innovative design, sound construction, good systems and fine sailing qualities, all topped off by the fact of its simply being a handsome vessel.

Lagoon39-600x

When Lagoon hired VPLP design to create a new series of boats, it wanted a truly new approach, not just a rehash of familiar elements, and the results are clearly evident in the first two representative of this effort, the 39 and the 52.

Among the most obvious innovations is the fact that the mast on the Lagoon 39 is positioned well aft. The result is an easily managed rig, divided between a relatively small, efficient mainsail (no more having to heave aloft the large, intimidatingly heavy mains found on a typical catamaran!) and a variety of foresails that average sailors can handle with ease.

Not surprisingly, this new mast location necessitated a completely new kind of structure that did not rely on the main bulkhead for support, which in turn changed the interior spaces. We like the result, with its excellent visibility, good grab points, easy traffic flow and openness. The boat also passes the important, “rowing away” test, as we think an owner will enjoy looking at it from the dinghy.

Lagoon39-int

That structural change could only work if both the design and execution were first-rate, and on the Lagoon 39, they are. Construction is careful and complete throughout, and the mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems are all neat and properly installed. Under sail, the Lagoon 39 is solid, stiff and quiet.

Oh, and it also happens to be a lot of fun! Underway the boat is responsive, yet tracks well, and helm feedback is instantaneous without being overpowering. The motion in a seaway is also easier than most cats this size, making for an overall package that should appeal to a wide range of sailing types.

cata-lagoon.com

Related

daviscards

Davis Instruments: Quick Reference Cards

CHECK THESEIf you’re sailing with new crew this summer or your kids have suddenly and inexplicably started to look up from their phones and take an interest in the finer points of cruising, these Quick Reference Cards from Davis are a great way to further their boating education. ...read more

01-rbir18-596

Another Epic Round Britain Race

There are basically two kinds of offshore sailboat races out there: those that take place annually, like the Fastnet and Chicago-to-Mackinac races; and those that take place every other year, like the Transpac and Newport-Bermuda race, in part so the competitors have sufficient ...read more

01b_WALKING-KEDGE-OUT-cmykpromo

Getting More Use From Kedge Anchors

If you are cruising, you need at least two anchors on board for the simple reason that you must have a backup. Imagine having to slip your anchor on a stormy night with other boats dragging down on yours, or having your rope rode severed by some unseen underwater obstacle, ...read more

SailAwayCharter

How-to: Navigating on a Bareboat Charter

So you graduated from navigation class where you practiced dead reckoning, doubling the angle on the bow and maybe even celestial nav, and you now feel well prepared for your first charter trip. Well, you won’t be doing any of that on vacation—not past the first day, anyway.Most ...read more

04-Turtle-rescue

Turtle Rescue in the Vic-Maui

Strange and often wonderful things can happen in the course of an offshore sailboat race, and one of the strangest and most wonderful things we’ve heard of recently took place during the 2,300-mile 2018 Vic-Maui race, from Victoria, British Columbia, to Lahaina, Hawaii.It ...read more

dorcap-open-blue

ATN Inc: Dorcap

COOL SLEEPYou’re fast asleep in a snug anchorage, forehatch open to catch the breeze, when you’re rudely awakened by a sneaky rain squall. Now you’re not only awake and wet, you’re sweltering with the hatch closed. Sucks, right? That’s why ATN came up with the Dorcap, an ...read more

HIGH-RES-29312-Tahiti-GSP

Ask Sail: Who has the right-of-way

WHO HAS RIGHT-OF-WAY?Q: I sail in Narragansett Bay, which is a relatively narrow body of water that has upwind boats generally going south and downwind boats generally going north. When sailboats are racing, the starboard tack boat has the right-of-way over the port tack boat, so ...read more