New Boats: the Beat Goes On

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The fall shows may have drawn to close here in the United States. But in today’s global marketplace, the business of building and designing new sailboats never stops. And, of course, lest we forget, the Miami boat show is just around the corner. What follows are some new boats either fresh off the drawing board or in-build that we can expect to see splash in the coming months.

Ovni 400

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Among the many things that French designers and builders are known for is their affinity for aluminum bluewater cruising boats, and the new Ovni 400 now in the works at the veteran Alubat yard looks to be a nice addition to the genre. The boat has a fine, tumblehome bow with a powerful square-top main and a lifting keel containing a ton of ballast. Combined with a pair of blunt aluminum rudders, the lifting keel means the boat is also more than happy to take the ground, whether to give the bottom a good scrubbing or just for the fun of it.

A mainsail arch helps keep the boom away from crews’ heads while another arch at the transom will work well for mounting things like antennas and solar panels. The headsail sheets to a track on the cabintrunk, providing tight angles when sailing hard on the wind, while a pair of helm stations well outboard promise clear sightlines around the rugged-looking hard dodger. The raised-saloon configuration features a set of wraparound windows enabling clear views from belowdecks and for watchkeepers when the weather gets snotty—something that’s sure to happen aboard a boat designed to voyage to the ends of the world the way this one is.

Corsair 880

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Meanwhile, on the other side of the world, it would be hard to imagine a more different kind of cruising boat than the all-new Corsair 880, produced in Vietnam’s Ho Chi Minh City. But make no mistake, despite this foldable tri’s svelte lines, the 880 is still very much a cruising boat, complete with standing headroom belowdecks and berths for five. In fact, so committed is Corsair to keeping the boat’s crews comfortable, it’s also offering such options as a bimini, boom tent, 12-volt cooler, solar panels, manual or electric toilet, and even a generator and heater/AC unit.

Of course, a boat like this is also all about performance, and to this end the 880 comes equipped with a centerboard and high-aspect rig with square-top main. For those in search of yet more horsepower, a “sport” version of the boat is also available, complete with an even taller rig, carbon spars and sprit, standard. Thanks to the 880’s easy-to-handle foldable amas and rig setup, the boat can be launched from a trailer and made ready to sail in as little as an hour, thereby creating a wealth of possibilities in terms of available cruising grounds.

Dragonfly 40

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Of course, Southeast Asia isn’t the only part of the world known for its foldable, fast-sailing trimarans. And in Scandinavia, Danish builder Quorning is currently adding to its unique line of folding, performance-cruisers with an all-new 40-footer, the Dragonfly 40, that takes the company’s game to a whole new level, both in terms of LOA and amenities. Available in either a “Touring” version with a self-tacking jib, or a turbocharged “Ultimate” version with an overlapping headsail, the boat also features a carbon mast, batten-car systems for the main and twin helms aft. Each ama has a pair of deck hatches that provide easy access to a plethora of storage area, and the accommodation space belowdecks (long a Quorning specialty) looks to be both well thought out and comfortable, with an L-shaped galley to port and a private double cabin aft.

Finally, there’s Quorning’s proprietary “Dragonfly Swing Wing” system which lets you deploy and retract the amas in a matter of seconds. As for the boat’s sailing qualities, if its anything like its predecessors, the Dragonfly 40 will be as stable and easy to sail as it is fast—to the point where you may on occasion have to look aft at the dramatic wake spooling out astern to truly appreciate your boatspeed.

Moody DS 41

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A bit farther south, Moody, now a part of Germany’s HanseGroup, is also breaking new ground by further expanding its DS, or “deck saloon,” line with the Moody DS 41. Like its predecessors, the DS 45 and DS 54, the Moody DS 41’s unique layout makes possible what Moody calls “living on one level,” in which the saloon and cockpit can be easily combined into a single barrier-free living space. Forward, the boat’s high-freeboard and high bulwarks also ensure maximum safety when moving about, whether it be to check the anchor or hang out in the expansive lounging area forward of the nicely sculpted deckhouse.

Twin helms well outboard ensure good sightlines forward and aloft, while the boat’s double-headsail rig will make things that much easier when shorthanded sailing. Belowdecks, there is a spacious owner’s cabin forward and the option of one or two heads, with a wealth of storage space aft below the cockpit sole—a great feature aboard any cruising boat. The large windows in the deckhouse with their 360-degree visibility will make for a wonderful place to relax and enjoy the outside world, no matter what the conditions.

Privilège 510 Signature

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Finally, back in France—Les Sables d’Olonne to be exact—we find the latest offering from luxury multihull builder Privilège: the Privilège 510. On most cats in this size range, the owner’s cabin is located in one of the boat’s hulls, but this Privilège catamaran offers an owner’s cabin spanning both hulls forward that has to be seen to believed—no exaggeration here! Beyond that, the 510 looks to be a truly striking catamaran in general, with an aggressive and functional aesthetic that doesn’t just follow the rest of the pack. Practical details include a raised helm station to port, flush hatches throughout and vacuum-infused construction with a PVC core and carbon reinforcement in the deck and bulkheads. A carbon mast and carbon boom complete the performance package. Belowdecks, the saloon is laid out somewhat uniquely, with the nav station tucked up against the aft bulkhead, a wonderfully expansive U-shaped galley to starboard and a generous dining area to port. A pair of guest cabins are located aft, each with its own private shower and head. Again, a striking yacht in the truest sense of the word. 

CONTACTS

Alubat alubat.com

Corsair Marine corsairmarine.com

Moody yachts.group/us/moody.html

Privilege Catamarans America privilegecatamaransamerica.com

Quorning Boats APS dragonfly.dk

November 2019

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