Najad 355

A fixed windshield and teak deck create a familiar Scandinavian look, but the Najad 355 appears sleeker than many offshore cruisers. "It attracts the younger crowd with a little higher performance, contemporary style and interior, and a racy look," said broker Rob Robinson. CONSTRUCTIONThe hull carries a flat underbody and a fine entry that flares gracefully into a moderately
Author:
Publish date:
HR-0208-BR-Najad355-1

A fixed windshield and teak deck create a familiar Scandinavian look, but the Najad 355 appears sleeker than many offshore cruisers. "It attracts the younger crowd with a little higher performance, contemporary style and interior, and a racy look," said broker Rob Robinson.

CONSTRUCTION

The hull carries a flat underbody and a fine entry that flares gracefully into a moderately wide beam. The cast-iron fin terminates in a modern lead bulb. A balanced spade rudder, linked to the wheel by rack-and-pinion gears and a chain loop, completes the underwater foil set. The vacuum-bagged, resin-infused epoxy hull has a closed-cell core extending upward from just below the turn of the bilge. Najad also laminates Divinycell foam into the deck. All the tanks are stainless steel, and the fuel tank has a pumpout from the bottom so you can remove accumulated sludge and keep the engine humming.

ON DECK

You can hoist sails from the helm and reach all the control lines easily, as they lead neatly to just the right spots in the cockpit. When you do need to go forward, excellent grabrails on the windshield lead to others on the cabintop, all well sized and spaced. A molded gutter leads to internal deck drains, so spray neither stands on the teak nor runs down to stain the topsides. The mooring cleats are huge. Mooring lines, a spare anchor, and fenders are all standard equipment.

What many owners call the "dashboard" (Najad calls it the "chart table" to distinguish it from the "nav station" in the cabin) beside the companionway holds sunglasses, sweaters, binoculars, chart kits, and other cruising necessities and incorporates a translucent skylight to brighten the interior. The side decks are easy to navigate, and the antiskid is excellent.

ACCOMMODATIONS

The interior is finished beautifully in African mahogany with just the right amount of fabric and white surface to make it friendly. The saloon is traditional, with two settees facing a square table; the settees expand to become full-width berths.

The L-shaped galley has the usual equipment as well as well-thought-out details. The self-closing drawers are elegantly constructed with unusual mitered joints.

The head compartment is large for a boat this length, and there's a separate wet locker for wet gear.

The V-berth in the forward cabin is wide enough at the bow to reduce foot interference with a sleeping partner, but the bunk is also high enough that you'll do a bit of climbing to get in and out of it.

The aft-cabin berth is queen-size and nearly square. This space has unusually good headroom for a boat this size. As in other cabins, the hanging locker has ventilation slots at the top to prevent mildew. A heating system is standard equipment.

UNDER SAIL

The cockpit proved to be as ergonomically laid out as it appeared to be at the dock. Visibility is excellent in all directions. The wheel feedback was excellent in 5 to 6 knots of breeze on an autumn day in Annapolis, Maryland, with no turbulence or sloppiness about it and a perfect gearing ratio for easy control and feedback. The loads on the genoa cars were light and the sail trim was simple for a singlehander or a shorthanded crew. The 355 is a sailor's boat. It consistently returned better than half the wind velocity in speed through the water. The hull form is quite slick, and the boat seems to coast forever.

UNDER POWER

The Najad 355 has a tiny turning circle, about ½ boatlength. You'll have to warn your guests before making whiplash turns, but the maneuverability will make you look like a pro at the dock. The electronic throttle lever clicks into forward, neutral, and reverse with fingertip pressure. A cruise setting of 1,900 RPM produced 6.8 knots and was quite quiet down below. Full throttle drives the boat to its displacement hull speed of 7.5 knots. A folding three-blade prop is standard.

VITAL STATISTICS

HEADROOM: Saloon 6'5", cabins 6' » BUNKS: Forward cabin 6'8"×6'5", aft cabin 6'8"×6'3"
» SETTEES: 6'3"×2'4" » COCKPIT SEATS: 7'×21"

SPECIFICATIONS:

Price: $300,000 (subject to currency values, FOB
Newport, RI) includes main and jib, basic electronics, ground tackle, commissioning

Builder: Najad, Henån, Sweden; www.najad.com

U.S. Importer: Scandinavian Yachts, Newport, RI; www.scandinavianyachts.com

Designer: Judel/Vrolijk

LOA: 35'10" » LWL: 31'5"

Beam: 11'3" » Draft: 6'3"/5'7"

Displacement: 13,669 lbs

Ballast: 5,604 lbs

Sail Area: 684 sq ft

Power: 28-hp Volvo Penta D1-305 saildrive

Tankage Fuel/Water/Waste: 39/66/15 gal

Electrical: 320-Ah AGM (house), 105-Ah (engine)

Displacement-Length ratio: 197

Sail Area-Displacement ratio: 19.1

Ballast-Displacement ratio: 41%

Certification: CE Category A (Ocean)

OUR TAKE

PROs:

  • Quality construction
  • Excellent, thoughtful detailing
  • Responsive sailing

CONs:

  • Limited distribution
    in U.S.
  • High step-up to
    forward berthsCONCLUSION:
    Edmund Burke's
    18th-century aesthetic notion that a large thing may be sublime, but only small things can be beautiful, applies to boats. A beautifully executed small sailboat can be utterly yachtlike. The Najad 355 is a fine example.

Related

Nathan-Bates-San-Diego,-CA

SAIL 2018: Reader's Photographs

Are you out there sailing, cruising and living the sailing life? If so, we’d love to see it. Send your sailing photos to sailmail@sailmagazine.com And don’t forget to sign up for our free eNewsletter. Check back for updates! I took this shot from Cooper Island Beach Club as my ...read more

TOTW_PromoSite

SAIL's Tip of the Week

Presented by Vetus-Maxwell. Got a tip? Send it to sailmail@sailmagazine.com Fall in line In the days before GPS, the best trick outside the book for finding a harbor in dense fog went like this: if it’s surrounded by rocks, forget it; if not, in you go, but never try to hit it ...read more

190115-Mark-Slats-Golden-Globe-Race2048x

Photo-Finish in the Golden Globe Race 2018

With less than 1,700 miles to go to the finish in Les Sables d'Olonne, France, second-place Mark Slats of the Netherlands has cut another 393 miles out of the lead held by French sailor Jean-Luc Van Den Heede in the Golden Globe 2018 race.  Jean-Luc aboard the Rustler 36 Matmut ...read more

06-Heineken-1-R2018_1March_©LaurensMorel_LMA5965_p

Post-Irma Heineken Regatta

Even more than a year and half later, the scars from Hurricane Irma are still all too visible on the island of St. Maarten. But if Irma couldn’t prevent the famed Heineken from taking place in the winter of 2017, you can bet it’s not going to put a crimp in either the racing or ...read more

05-TRANSPAC_71417_SG_055268

The Transpac Prepares for No. 50

Because modern yachting is in many ways an invention of the early to mid 20th century, in recent years sailors have been celebrating any number of milestone anniversaries. Now it’s the biennial Transpac’s turn, as it prepares for its 50th race from Southern California (following ...read more

_theLapitaDesign

Catamaran Man: James Wharram

Next time you climb on board a Lagoon in the Caribbean or spy a Prout bobbing in the harbor, spare a thought for James Wharram. Though this somewhat froward Englishman won’t thank me for saying so, he is partly responsible for both—and indeed, all the other modern catamarans now ...read more

Radar

Ask SAIL: Radar Antenna Location

Q: I have a 40ft Pearson with a 24-mile radar antenna installed on the radar arch aft. I am concerned that I could be missing medium-range targets beyond eight to 10 miles away. Should I have the antenna moved to the mast, 10ft higher than where it is now? — Jack Crawford, ...read more