Multi 23

I saw 19.9 knots on my handheld GPS, and I know we went faster than that, but at the time I wasn’t paying close attention to any GPS readout. The breeze was gusting into the 20s, and we were joking about whether or not the Marina del Rey harbor police would nail us for speeding.
Author:
Publish date:
Updated on
 Photo courtesy of Multi 23

Photo courtesy of Multi 23

I saw 19.9 knots on my handheld GPS, and I know we went faster than that, but at the time I wasn’t paying close attention to any GPS readout. The breeze was gusting into the 20s, and we were joking about whether or not the Marina del Rey harbor police would nail us for speeding. On a different day, maybe they would have, but we had an expanse of protected flat water all to ourselves to play with Mike Leneman’s Multi 23, a nifty little speedster with thoroughbred genes, and play we did.

Coming from the design board of the French firm Van Peteghem Lauriot Prévost—it’s not only acceptable, but cool to call them VPLP—the Multi 23 is wrapped in high expectations. VPLP is a leading designer of ocean-going trimarans, and they are celebrated for their work on USA-17, the giant tri that won the America’s Cup in 2010.

In this case they’ve created an open boat aimed at sailors with a go-fast mentality. I picture this as a boat for racers, including those with a taste for boat camping. A dedicated cockpit tent is optional, and the boat’s cockpit lockers, plus a 9ft dry locker forward of the mast, can accommodate sails and then some.

The Multi 23 weighs just 700 pounds and features very full, buoyant amas. You can press with confidence, as the boat does not want to dive and stick.

The center hull has a fine entry and flat run aft for a slick exit. I felt clumsy with the long double hiking sticks and the twin-rudder setup, but that was about me. I’d welcome getting more time in the boat to get used to it. The helm was light and quick. The boat tracked easily through tacks, and the self-tacking jib minimized the “work” load. Gybing involved no drama at all.

The standard auxiliary is an inboard-mounted electric motor, but Leneman, who imports the Multi 23 to North America, uses an outboard to achieve the 15 miles of motoring range required by local racing authorities.

The boat is trailerable, but it takes about an hour to launch and an hour to retrieve. Leneman stores his boat in a lift-dock wide enough to accommodate its 15ft beam. The centerboard and rudders pivot, so yes, the boat is beachable, but this isn’t really an off-the-beach toy.

Carbon-reinforced crossbeams and carefully engineered attachments contribute to a stiff structure. The hulls are constructed of infused vinylester resin, with solid glass below the waterline and Corecell foam on the topside sections and deck.

The boats are built in Qingdao, China, and the fit and finish are convincing. Both rig options feature a rotating aluminum wing mast. The “cruiser” version has a reefable Dacron main and jib. I sailed with the high-aspect square-head main. Add Leneman’s custom, larger-than-stock jib mounted on a custom bowsprit—in honor of the usually light conditions in the region—and we had all the power we could use.

Given more runway and a steadier breeze, boat and crew could have handled a spinnaker or screacher and it would have been, literally, a blast.

SPECIFICATIONS

LOA 21ft 4in

BEAM 15ft 6in

DRAFT 1ft 4in-4ft 4in

DRY WEIGHT 660 lbs

SAIL AREA 328 ft2 (Racing main & jib)

DESIGNER Van Peteghem Lauriot Prévost

MANUFACTURER Torpen Marine

US AGENT Multimarine, Venice, CA, 310-821-6762

PRICE $28,900 base—around $38,000 with trailer, motor, blocks, sheets and racing sails

Related

Meridian-X-Spin_2

MOB: A Whistle in the Wind

Mark Wheeler went overboard a few minutes before midnight. He was in the middle of Lake Michigan, 30 miles offshore in 40 knots of wind. As he fumbled for the lanyard to inflate his lifejacket he watched his racing sailboat, Meridian X, disappear into the night at more than 18 ...read more

TOTW_PromoSite

SAIL's Tip of the Week

Presented by Vetus-Maxwell. Got a tip? Send it to sailmail@sailmagazine.com Slapper stopper  When I came on deck at 0800 to hoist my colors on a visitors’ mooring recently, there was an awkward slop running in. This doesn’t trouble my Mason 44, which has a traditional counter ...read more

Tilly-1

Gear: Tilley Polaris Hat

A True Blue Tilley Sailing is all about fun in the sun, but it sometimes doesn’t take long to get too much of a good thing, especially when on a prolonged cruise or offshore passage. Enter the Tilley Polaris, the latest lid developed by iconic Canadian hat-maker Tilley. ...read more

Sand-TOWEL_MODEL-3

CGear Sand-Free Beach Towel

Sand Be Gone! The summer is hot and full of terrors—not the least of which is the sand that sticks in your beach towel in the hopes of a free ride back to your car or boat. Fortunately, there's now the CGear Sand-Free Beach Towel, engineered in polyester to not only dry quickly ...read more

01-Blowup-Tiwal2_sailing-(3)

Gear: Tiwal Inflatable Sailing Dinghy

Blow-up Boating A few years ago, the French company Tiwal arrived on U.S. shores with that most improbable of products, an inflatable sailing dinghy that actually sails the way a boat is supposed to. Now, nearly 1,000 Tiwal 3’s later, the company is back with its Tiwal 2, an ...read more

Koozy

Gear: 22 Below Koozie

Killer Koozie For all that sailors love the warmth of this time of year, that same warmth can also wreak havoc on their otherwise icy-cold beers. (Unless, of course, you drink them very, very fast. But we won’t go there.) To help deal with this terrible hardship, North ...read more

Cool-Specs

Gear: Gill's Race Fusion Sunglasses

Wicked Cool Specs Is there anything in the world of sailing more fun than a cool pair of shades? Heck, no! And it would hard to find a cooler pair than these new Race Fusion specs from longtime weather-gear manufacture Gill. In addition to looking great, they include a number of ...read more

North_new

Gear: North Sails Waterproof Pack

A few years ago, North Sails made a big push into the apparel business with all kinds of sharp-looking button-down shirts, shorts and fleeces. That doesn’t mean, though, that the North Sails Collection isn’t still plenty practical, as is evident in its new roll-over waterproof ...read more