Moody 45

The acquisition a few years ago of British boatbuilder Moody Yachts by Germany’s Hanse set the scene for an unlikely marriage. Moody was known for solid, staid cruising boats, built for comfort, not speed; Hanse’s spectacular growth during the previous decade had been fuelled by an attractive line-up of fast cruisers that combined zippy performance and sporty lines with brash
Author:
Publish date:
Updated on
moody_45_classic



The acquisition a few years ago of British boatbuilder Moody Yachts by Germany’s Hanse set the scene for an unlikely marriage. Moody was known for solid, staid cruising boats, built for comfort, not speed; Hanse’s spectacular growth during the previous decade had been fuelled by an attractive line-up of fast cruisers that combined zippy performance and sporty lines with brash interior design. What manner of offspring would spring forth from this union?

Bill Dixon, chief designer at Moody for two decades, set to his task with a will. The first Moody to issue forth from the Greifswald, Germany, delivery room drew a collective gasp of shock from the boating world; the 45 DS had nothing in common with its ancestors, except that it floated. No more sensible but unexciting center-cockpit styling; here was a radical-looking boat that threw conventional ideas about accommodation layouts right out of the porthole. A huge deckhouse with a targa-style top brought seating, cooking, and dining areas together on one level; only sleeping quarters and heads were belowdecks.

As you’d expect, few people were neutral about such a bold concept; they either hated it or loved it. Encouragingly, the reception from owners of traditional Moodys was largely positive. The DS looks to me like an ideal warm-climate coastal explorer, blending the rewarding sailing feel of a monohull with the ergonomic enticements of a cruising catamaran. Though it is being marketed as a “world cruiser,” the boat’s open transom, large windows, and glass sliding doors are not features you’d normally associate with such a role.

nontraditional_moody_45_ds

The 45DS has been in production for over a year, and a 62-foot version is on the drawing board—more on that soon. The latest Moody, introduced in January, is another departure altogether. The 45 Classic, also designed by the versatile Dixon, will be altogether more palatable to traditionalists. Below the waterline, fine hull lines and foils sculpted for performance offset the traditional look of the cabintop and decks. Twin wheels and a Scandinavian-style hard windscreen set a tone that continues belowdecks with glossy mahogany woodwork and quilted leather upholstery. The tall double-spreader rig is biased towards the mainsail and carries a self-tacking jib that should make this good-looking cruiser a snap to sail.

We’re still waiting to see if either of these boats will make it across the Atlantic for the fall boat shows, and we’re looking forward to sailing both of them.

Related

Tilly-1

Gear: Tilley Polaris Hat

A True Blue Tilley Sailing is all about fun in the sun, but it sometimes doesn’t take long to get too much of a good thing, especially when on a prolonged cruise or offshore passage. Enter the Tilley Polaris, the latest lid developed by iconic Canadian hat-maker Tilley. ...read more

Sand-TOWEL_MODEL-3

CGear Sand-Free Beach Towel

Sand Be Gone! The summer is hot and full of terrors—not the least of which is the sand that sticks in your beach towel in the hopes of a free ride back to your car or boat. Fortunately, there's now the CGear Sand-Free Beach Towel, engineered in polyester to not only dry quickly ...read more

01-Blowup-Tiwal2_sailing-(3)

Gear: Tiwal Inflatable Sailing Dinghy

Blow-up Boating A few years ago, the French company Tiwal arrived on U.S. shores with that most improbable of products, an inflatable sailing dinghy that actually sails the way a boat is supposed to. Now, nearly 1,000 Tiwal 3’s later, the company is back with its Tiwal 2, an ...read more

Koozy

Gear: 22 Below Koozie

Killer Koozie For all that sailors love the warmth of this time of year, that same warmth can also wreak havoc on their otherwise icy-cold beers. (Unless, of course, you drink them very, very fast. But we won’t go there.) To help deal with this terrible hardship, North ...read more

Cool-Specs

Gear: Gill's Race Fusion Sunglasses

Wicked Cool Specs Is there anything in the world of sailing more fun than a cool pair of shades? Heck, no! And it would hard to find a cooler pair than these new Race Fusion specs from longtime weather-gear manufacture Gill. In addition to looking great, they include a number of ...read more

North_new

Gear: North Sails Waterproof Pack

A few years ago, North Sails made a big push into the apparel business with all kinds of sharp-looking button-down shirts, shorts and fleeces. That doesn’t mean, though, that the North Sails Collection isn’t still plenty practical, as is evident in its new roll-over waterproof ...read more

TOTW_PromoSite

SAIL's Tip of the Week

Presented by Vetus-Maxwell. Got a tip? Send it to sailmail@sailmagazine.com Sort the charts  Lying here on the cockpit seat is my iPad, loaded with Navionics charts. It’s a classic example of the benefits of GPS-assisted paper chart navigation and the wonderful electronics ...read more