Moody 45

The acquisition a few years ago of British boatbuilder Moody Yachts by Germany’s Hanse set the scene for an unlikely marriage. Moody was known for solid, staid cruising boats, built for comfort, not speed; Hanse’s spectacular growth during the previous decade had been fuelled by an attractive line-up of fast cruisers that combined zippy performance and sporty lines with brash
Author:
Publish date:
Updated on
moody_45_classic



The acquisition a few years ago of British boatbuilder Moody Yachts by Germany’s Hanse set the scene for an unlikely marriage. Moody was known for solid, staid cruising boats, built for comfort, not speed; Hanse’s spectacular growth during the previous decade had been fuelled by an attractive line-up of fast cruisers that combined zippy performance and sporty lines with brash interior design. What manner of offspring would spring forth from this union?

Bill Dixon, chief designer at Moody for two decades, set to his task with a will. The first Moody to issue forth from the Greifswald, Germany, delivery room drew a collective gasp of shock from the boating world; the 45 DS had nothing in common with its ancestors, except that it floated. No more sensible but unexciting center-cockpit styling; here was a radical-looking boat that threw conventional ideas about accommodation layouts right out of the porthole. A huge deckhouse with a targa-style top brought seating, cooking, and dining areas together on one level; only sleeping quarters and heads were belowdecks.

As you’d expect, few people were neutral about such a bold concept; they either hated it or loved it. Encouragingly, the reception from owners of traditional Moodys was largely positive. The DS looks to me like an ideal warm-climate coastal explorer, blending the rewarding sailing feel of a monohull with the ergonomic enticements of a cruising catamaran. Though it is being marketed as a “world cruiser,” the boat’s open transom, large windows, and glass sliding doors are not features you’d normally associate with such a role.

nontraditional_moody_45_ds

The 45DS has been in production for over a year, and a 62-foot version is on the drawing board—more on that soon. The latest Moody, introduced in January, is another departure altogether. The 45 Classic, also designed by the versatile Dixon, will be altogether more palatable to traditionalists. Below the waterline, fine hull lines and foils sculpted for performance offset the traditional look of the cabintop and decks. Twin wheels and a Scandinavian-style hard windscreen set a tone that continues belowdecks with glossy mahogany woodwork and quilted leather upholstery. The tall double-spreader rig is biased towards the mainsail and carries a self-tacking jib that should make this good-looking cruiser a snap to sail.

We’re still waiting to see if either of these boats will make it across the Atlantic for the fall boat shows, and we’re looking forward to sailing both of them.

Related

TOTW_PromoSite

SAIL's Tip of the Week

Presented by Vetus-Maxwell. Got a tip? Send it to sailmail@sailmagazine.com No chafe, safe stay  If you’re leaving the boat unattended for a longish period, there’s a lot to be said for cow-hitching the shorelines, as this sailor did. They’ll never let go, and so long as the ...read more

belize600x

Charter Special: Belize

It would be hard to imagine a more secure spot than the Sunsail base on the outskirts of the beachside community of Placencia, Belize. The entire marina is protected by a robust seawall with a channel scarcely a few boatlengths across. It’s also located far enough up Placencia ...read more

DSC00247

DIY: a Top-to-Bottom Refit

I found my sailing “dream boat” in the spring of 1979 while racing on Lake St. Clair in Michigan. Everyone had heard about the hot new boat in town, and we were anxiously awaiting the appearance of this new Pearson 40. She made it to the starting line just before the race ...read more

01-oysteryachts-regattas-loropiana2016_063

Light-air Sails and How to Handle Them

In the second of a two-part series on light-air sails, Rupert Holmes looks at how today’s furling gear has revolutionized sail handling off the wind. Read part 1 here. It’s easy to look at long-distance racing yachts of 60ft and above with multiple downwind sails set on roller ...read more

HanseCharles

Video Tour: Hanse 348

“It’s a smaller-size Hanse cruiser, but with some big-boat features,” says SAIL’s Cruising Editor, Charles J. Doane. At last fall’s Annapolis Boat Show, Doane had a chance to take a close look at the new Hanse 348. Some of the boat’s highlights include under-deck galleries for ...read more

amalfitown

Charter Destination: Amalfi Coast

Prego! Weeks after returning from our Italian flotilla trip last summer, I was still feeling the relaxed atmosphere of the Amalfi Coast. It’s a Mediterranean paradise, with crystal-clear waters, charming hillside towns and cliffside villages, plenty of delicious food and wine, ...read more

image005

Inside or Outside When Sailing the ICW

Last April, my wife, Marjorie, and I decided to take our Tartan 4100, Meri, north to Maryland from her winter home in Hobe Sound, Florida. This, in turn, meant deciding whether to stay in the “Ditch” for the duration or go offshore part of the way. Although we had both been ...read more

MK1_30542

SailGP: There’s a New Sailing Series in Town

San Francisco was the venue of the biggest come-from-behind victory in the history of the America’s Cup when Oracle Team USA beat Emirates Team New Zealand in 2013, so it seems only fitting that the first American round of Larry Ellison’s new SailGP pro sailing series will be ...read more