Boat Review: Lagoon 450 - Sail Magazine

Boat Review: Lagoon 450

This impressive new offering from the French builder succeeds the long-lived 440. It is one big cat, over 25ft wide and with a cast interior fitted out in light woods to make the most of the sunlight filtering through the plentiful ports and windows.
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As the largest builder of cruising catamarans in the world, Lagoon has been supplying charter fleets in tradewind zones for many years. I have sailed the Lagoon 440 in a breeze and am confident that this new model will be perfectly happy when the wind pipes up and the waves roll.

Under Power

Our test boat carried twin 54-horsepower Yanmar diesels with saildrives and fixed props; 40hp engines are an option. Folding or feathering props will improve the already good sailing performance.

At a cruise setting of 2,900 rpm the boat made a hair under 8 knots in smooth water, quite a respectable performance. The sound level was quite low, only 69 dBA in the saloon at the normal 7-knot cruising speed. Close-quarters handling was equally good. The turning circle with both engines in forward at a fast idle was only one boatlength, and, of course, the boat pirouetted in its own water with the two engines pushing in opposite directions. I appreciated the raised flybridge helm station, where 360 degrees of perfect visibility made docking easy. The wheel takes only one turn from lock to lock, and despite a bit of springiness in the linkage, steering always felt positive and responsive. As with other big cats, there’s not much feedback from the rudder to the helm.

Conclusion

lagoon_int3

The Lagoon 450 hits a sweet spot in terms of size. It can carry a family or a couple with guests in style, but is still small enough for an owner to sail and maintain without a professional captain. While the 450 will surely show up in charter fleets around the world, it is also an attractive choice for a private owner who wishes to cross big waters and then entertain in luxurious comfort at the destination.

Specifications
HEADROOM 6ft 6in
CABIN HEADROOM 6ft 6in
BERTHS 5ft 3in x 6ft 8in
FWD BERTH 5ft 3in x 6ft 7in
LOA 45ft 1in
LWL 43ft 11in
BEAM 25ft 9in
DRAFT 4ft 3in
DISPLACEMENT 34,178 (light)
SAIL AREA 1,071 ft2
FUEL/WATER/WASTE (GAL) 264/184/21
ENGINE 2 x 55hp Yanmar
ELECTRICAL 684aH (house), plus 2x105aH (engines)
DESIGNER VPLP (Marc van Peteghem & Vincent Lauriot Prevost). Interior: Nauta Yachts
BUILDER Lagoon America, cata-lagoon.com
PRICE $528,641 base; $717, 696 FOB East Coast as tested, includes sails and electronics
SAIL AREA-DISP. RATIO 16.4 (100% foretriangle)
DISP.-LENGTH RATIO 180

This impressive new offering from the French builder succeeds the long-lived 440. It is one big cat, over 25ft wide and with a cast interior fitted out in light woods to make the most of the sunlight filtering through the plentiful ports and windows.

For more information on the Lagoon 450, click here.

SPECS:

LOA: 45ft 10in
BEAM: 25ft 9in
DRAFT: 4ft 3in
DISPLACEMENT: 34,178lb
SAIL AREA: 1,071 sq ft
FUEL/WATER (GAL): 264/92
ENGINE: 2 X 40hp to 2 X 55 hp Saildrive diesel
BUILDER: Construction Navale Bordeaux

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