Corsair Sprint 750 MK II

I boarded the new Corsair Sprint 750 MK II with some trepidation. I’m far from the world’s most experienced multihull sailor and wondered if I’d be up to the task of putting a rocket like the 750 through its paces. I needn’t have worried, though; despite its horsepower, this is a boat that takes care of its crew and can make even a rank neophyte look good as it pours on the speed.
Author:
Publish date:
Corsair-A

I boarded the new Corsair Sprint 750 MK II with some trepidation. I’m far from the world’s most experienced multihull sailor and wondered if I’d be up to the task of putting a rocket like the 750 through its paces. I needn’t have worried, though; despite its horsepower, this is a boat that takes care of its crew and can make even a rank neophyte look good as it pours on the speed.

<iframe src='http://players.brightcove.net/3791031131001/S1tihGFI_default/index.html?videoId=3976006203001' allowfullscreen frameborder=0></iframe>


As soon as we’d unfurled the mainsail from the trademark rolling boom, the 750 immediately accelerated forward. Impressive though that was, it paled in comparison to the way the boat lit up 5 minutes later when we unfurled the screecher. The acceleration and exhilaration that comes from this kind of performance afloat is nothing less than incredible. We had neither a speed log nor a GPS on board, but to be perfectly honest, I couldn’t have given a damn—although I estimate we were easily hitting double digits sailing in 14 or so knots of true wind. You don’t need to know how many knots you’re making to have fun on a boat like the 750 MK II.

And it was all so easy. Sailing such a boat is much different than sailing a displacement monohull and takes some getting used to. As the apparent wind builds and surges forward, you steer the boat to get up on a plane and then do your best to keep it there, even if it means sacrificing your gybing angles in the interest of VMG, or velocity made good. I’d be the first to admit that I have a ways to go before I can claim to have mastered this kind of sailing. But the 750 makes it tantalizingly easy and leaves you hungering for more.

Corsair-B

This is no accident: the MK II version of the Sprint combines its predecessor’s expansive, racer-friendly cockpit and powerful rig with the larger, approximately 35 percent more buoyant amas of the more cruiser-oriented Dash 750 to create a hybrid that blennds increased stability with blistering speed. Multihull veteran Steve Marsh of Finish Line yacht sales—my host for the test sail—said he couldn’t get over how much harder he could drive the MK II, even in heavy air and big seas with the A-sail up.

Despite such go-fast features as a rotating aluminum wing mast, fiber shrouds, Harken 16 primary winches and hiking straps, this is a boat that can also be daysailed without scaring your passengers. There’s even a double bunk and room for a Porta-Potti if you feel like anchoring out for a night. Like the rest of the Corsair line, the Sprint 750 MK II’s amas fold up easily and the mast can be easily raised and lowered in the interest of trailering—thereby opening the door to regattas and cruising spots nationwide.

As one monohull sailor to another, if you’re looking for something to spice up your sailing and you like going fast, you owe it to yourself to give this boat a test sail. You’ll never look at sailing the same way again.

Specifications

LOA 24ft 4in // LWL 23ft 1in
BEAM 18ft 2in (overall); 8ft 2in (amas folded)
DRAFT 5ft 5in (board down); 1ft (board up)
DISPLACEMENT 1,850lb (light ship)
SAIL AREA 428ft2 (main and jib)
DESIGNER Corsair Marine
BUILDERCorsair Marine International, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
U.S. DISTRIBUTOR USA Corsair Marine, pjohns@corsairmarine.com

Photos courtesy of Billy Black

Related

Before-and-after-1_silo

Know How: Cleaning Stainless

Without a doubt, the best way to “clean” stainless steel parts is to have them electropolished. Electropolishing is an electrochemical process that cleans the stainless and removes any surface iron particles, leaving a shiny and far more rust-resistant surface. The downsides of ...read more

catstory

Cruising: Sailing With a Young Family

The dark is alive when you are surrounded by water. Black is tinted blue and silver, and sky meets surf with electricity and the lapping sounds of silence. Inside our 36ft catamaran, moored off Cooper Island in the BVI, the raw nature outside, just now settling down from a late ...read more

IslandPacket349

Boat Review: Island Packet 349

After years of quiescence in the wake of the Great Recession, iconic Island Packet is back with its new 349, a re-boot of the old Estero that not only looks great, but takes the Island Packet style of sailing performance to a new level. Design & Construction First among the many ...read more

190219NEEL51

Video Tour: Neel 51 Trimaran

At this past fall’s Annapolis Boat Show, SAIL magazine had a chance to corner Neel Trimarans founder Eric Bruneel and have him give us a tour of the accommodations aboard the new Neel 51, winner of the “Multihull over 50ft” category in the 2019 Best Boats contest. For a complete ...read more

IMG_0173

Electronic “Flares” for Cruisers

The United States Coast Guard requires that all boats operating in coastal waters or on the high seas carry a selection of visual distress signals. Almost invariably, such signals include the pyrotechnic type, either handheld or fired from a flare pistol, but surely there are ...read more

M2-HOOK-TOP-AND-CHAIN-1

Gear: M2 Chain Hook from Mantus

Stay Hooked Chain hooks on anchor snubber lines tend to fall off when you least want them to. Not so this latest example from Mantus. The M2 Chain Hook is secured to the chain by a simple elastic strap, so it won’t come off when the snubber loosens. Made from corrosion-resistant ...read more