Best Boats 2015: Gunfleet 58 - Sail Magazine

Best Boats 2015: Gunfleet 58

We had little trouble choosing the Gunfleet 58 as the SAIL Flagship for 2015. A thoughtfully designed, carefully constructed and beautifully detailed vessel, this is what a modern luxury sailing yacht should be.  
Author:
Publish date:
The Gunfleet 58 boasts systems and performance that are as impressive as its gorgeous looks

The Gunfleet 58 boasts systems and performance that are as impressive as its gorgeous looks

We had little trouble choosing the Gunfleet 58 as the SAIL Flagship for 2015. A thoughtfully designed, carefully constructed and beautifully detailed vessel, this is what a modern luxury sailing yacht should be.

Designer Tony Castro gave the boat an efficient hull form with a sharp entry, plumb bow and plenty of beam aft. Not only does this give good speed and stability, it increases the volume available for an owner’s cabin that rivals those on many boats 10 or even 20 feet longer.

Look underwater for a big surprise: this is a centerboarder. The cast-iron board lifts to reduce draft to 5ft 8in for easy piloting in coastal waters and lowers to nearly 12 feet for top performance offshore. There’s an optional fixed, 6ft 9in keel. Twin spade rudders ensure control at any angle of heel.

[Structural components and systems are all to very high standards. The AC and DC electrical systems are modern but not experimental, the plumbing is conventional and the engine room is mechanic-friendly. Hydraulic muscle controls the major stresses, including mainsail furling and centerboard lifting, while electric winches take care of the sheets. There’s no need for a husky crew on the Gunfleet 58.

Those who cruise aboard the Gunfleet 58 do so in comfort and contemporary style. Belowdecks, the spaces are open and exceptionally bright, thanks to the wide beam and large windows in the hull topsides. Appointed in tasteful fabrics and light oak joinery, this is a lovely space.

It is good to have goals in life and the Gunfleet 58 is a boat to aspire to. Not only for sailors, but for other builders, many of whom will have to ratchet up their work quality to reach this standard. gunfleetmarine.com

Related

TOTW_PromoSite

SAIL's Tip of the Week

Presented by Vetus-Maxwell.Got a tip? Send it to sailmail@sailmagazine.comDitch the stress Owners of high-freeboard yachts best boarded via the stern sugar-scoop like to back them into a slip, but the process can be fraught on a windy day or when there’s a current running, ...read more

Sun-Odyssey-490-Bertrand_DUQUENNE-aft

Boat Review: Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 490

True innovation in monohull sailboat design can be a bit elusive these days. That’s not to say that there are no more new ideas, but it does seem that many new tweaks and introductions are a bit incremental: let’s say evolutionary rather than revolutionary. Just when it seems ...read more

X3M-family

Gear: X3M Flight blocks

Block PartyThe elegance of these new X3M Flight blocks from Ubi Maior conceals the fact that they can handle loads of up to 15 tons. Designed to be used with a variety of textile loops, as fixed or snatch blocks, the X3M blocks have resin frames to carry the loops and anodized ...read more

03-BAVARIA-C34_Interior-2k_2

Ask Sail: The Right Cabin Sole Finish

Q: I am working on refinishing my cabin floorboards. I have brought them home and sanded the old finish off and would appreciate comments on using varnish or polyurethane for the sole.— Danny Love, Grand Rivers, KYDON CASEY REPLIES Polyurethane is the better choice for a cabin ...read more

shutterstock_peterisland

The Caribbean Charter Trade Rides Again

“The BVI is now a bit like it was 20 years ago,” Josie Tucci, vice president of sales and marketing for sister companies Sunsail and The Moorings, told me last December. “Instead of full bars, it may be a guy on the beach with a cooler and a barbeque, but the spirit of the place ...read more

Dragging01

Waterlines: Fear of Dragging

If you have a paranoid personality, anchoring out can be a validating experience. On the one hand, it seems rather simple. You amble up to the bow of your boat, drop a lump of metal overboard, let out some rode and secure it somehow. Then you stroll back to your cockpit and ...read more