Alerion Express 33

Daysailers are back. They’re not the low-cost, first-step, “let’s learn to sail” boats of the 1970s, but instead are elegant, classic-looking upscale little yachts for experienced skippers who have steadily moved up to cruisers over the years and now seek something simpler. The Alerion Express 33 fills a gap in that company’s line of 20- to 38-foot daysailers. On Deck•
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Daysailers are back. They’re not the low-cost, first-step, “let’s learn to sail” boats of the 1970s, but instead are elegant, classic-looking upscale little yachts for experienced skippers who have steadily moved up to cruisers over the years and now seek something simpler. The Alerion Express 33 fills a gap in that company’s line of 20- to 38-foot daysailers.

On Deck

• The Alerion cockpit is exceptionally comfortable, with well-proportioned backrests and ergonomic seating positions.

• You need never go out on deck until you pick up your mooring because every sail control leads exactly where a singlehander would want it to be. An electric winch does all the heavy work.

• The boom is high enough to clear everybody seated in the cockpit, but low enough to reach for final sail flaking.

• The wheel is big enough to reach easily from either side of the helm station, but small enough to get around when moving forward or aft.

• Visibility and sight lines in all directions are outstanding.

Belowdeck

• The cabin is small but efficient, with overnight accommodations in a V-berth, an enclosed head, and basic cooking facilities.

• Step belowdeck to enjoy the Herreshoff look of a century ago. White surfaces, teak trim, and solid-color fabrics with white piping are balanced harmoniously to create a classic ambiance.

• The plumbing and electrical systems are all of high quality, installed to the best standards. There are even gaskets and latches on the floorboards, something many cruising boats lack.

• Access to the Alerion’s engine is good, and there’s effective soundproofing to keep the noise level low while under way.

Under sail

• The boat responds immediately to a touch on the helm without feeling squirrely or oversensitive. It tracks perfectly and is so well balanced it will sail straight indefinitely in smooth water without a hand on the wheel.

• In 5 to 6 knots of wind on Biscayne Bay, the boat effortlessly returned nearly 5 knots of boatspeed, with five adults lounging in the cockpit.

• We tacked in substantially less than 90 degrees with little loss of way and no jib trimming, thanks to the Hoyt jib boom.

• Downwind, the Hoyt boom steadied the jib whether we were on a broad reach or wing-and-wing.

• The electric winch provided ample power to raise and trim the big-roached mainsail. Lightweight or older sailors will have no trouble managing this boat.

Conclusion

The Alerion Express 33 is a highly refined statement of what a daysailer should be. In addition to excellent performance, quality construction, and effortless handling, it’s truly singlehander-friendly. Best of all, it’s sure to be the most beautiful vessel in most harbors.

BOAT REVIEW

Alerion Express 33

Price: $199,900 (base FOB Portsmouth, RI) not including sails or commissioning

Builder: Pearson Composites, Warren RI;

www.pearsoncomposites.com

Designer: Garry Hoyt, Newport R&D;

www.alerionexpress.net

LOA 33'

LWL 26'7”

Beam 9’3”

Draft 5’3”

Displacement 8,700 lbs

Ballast 3,300 lbs

Sail Area 443 sq ft

Power 20-hp Yanmar

Displacement-Length ratio 206

Sail Area-Displacement ratio 16

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