by Adam Cort

Adam Cort is SAIL’s executive editor. He lives and sails in the Boston area.

For years West Marine has been offering its own line of branded foul-weather gear, and its Trysail jacket and bibs serve as an excellent example of what to look for in bluewater cruising gear.

MLX Double-Braid Cordage

by Adam Cort, Posted August 10, 2012
MLX double-braid cordage features a blended high-modulus Innegra-S and Dyneema core for strength and a polyester cover for durability. The result is a lightweight affordable rope with high strength and low stretch.

Serious Floating Shades

by Adam Cort, Posted August 9, 2012
Stuff going over the side is one of the hazards of sailing, but these new “Floater” polarized photochromic shades from Australia’s Barz Optics will stay on the water’s surface, even in rough conditions.

Modular Rogue Backpack

by Adam Cort, Posted August 8, 2012
Harken’s waterproof Rogue backpack is constructed from thermoplastic polyurethane-impregnated nylon, which resists abrasion, stains and UV radiation.
Don’t write off Olympic windsurfing just yet. A firestorm of opposition to the International Sailing Federation’s decision to dump the event in favor of kiteboarding at the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro makes it highly likely that there will be another vote.

Record-Setting Seabird

by Adam Cort, Posted August 3, 2012
French sailor Alain Thébault is taking speed sailing to a whole new level, with an eye toward setting a new Pacific offshore sailing record aboard his hydrofoil l’Hydroptère DCNS—the same boat that set a world speed record of 51.36 knots over 500 meters back in 2009. 
The 2012 Olympic regatta is now underway with a total of 380 sailors from around the world—237 men and 143 women—competing for gold in 10 events. Racing started in the Finn, Star and women’s Elliott 6m match-racing classes on Sunday, with the Laser, Laser Radial and 49er classes joining in on Monday.
With the increased emphasis on “extreme” pro racing—including wing-sailed carbon-fiber cats, gigantic oceangoing multihulls and Volvo 70s leaving arrow-straight wakes across the Southern Ocean—many might consider the idea of an inshore displacement monohull circuit to be a nonstarter.
The Torqeedo-powered Sea Eagle inflatable kayak takes pocket cruising to a whole new level. The combination of a 1hp Torqeedo Ultralight 403 electric motor, 23-watt PowerFilm flexible solar panel, Sea Eagle QuikSail and, of course, paddles provides the range and flexibility you need to go just about anywhere.

Snuggle Up Afloat

by Adam Cort, Posted July 13, 2012
Why hang out in a hammock when you can cuddle up in a Cacoon? As a practical matter, a Cacoon only requires a single attachment point—think a halyard or topping lift, something that is obviously pretty easy to find on a sailboat.
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