by Meredith Laitos

Meredith Laitos is SAIL’s Senior Editor. She sails in and around Boston and specializes in charter destinations.

To call Matt Rutherford an “adventurer” is an understatement. At 30, Rutherford has already biked through Southeast Asia, singlehandedly circumnavigated the Atlantic in a Pearson 323 (twice!) and embarked on a solo circumnavigation of the Americas. Having successfully made his way through the Northwest Passage this summer, Rutherford is now sailing south along the west coast of
When Gary Jobson saw his first 12-meter at age 12, he dreamed of someday getting a taste of the America’s Cup. Over the next five decades— from his role as tactician for Ted Turner aboard Courageous in 1977 to his role as an ESPN commentator in New Zealand in 2003—Jobson got his taste, and then some. Along the way, he met a host of fascinating characters, often switching from racer to
Six weeks before we took off for St. Lucia, my nervous father texted me, “I’m buying some new clothes for the trip. Will I be okay in T-shirts and quick- dry tops?” “Sure!” I replied, “Think about buying some linen, too.” “Linen?” he texted back, “where on my body and where on a boat would I put linen?” 
Star Clippers, which operates three of the world’s largest and tallest sailing vessels, has expanded its itineraries to include trips through the Baltic beginning in summer 2012. The 360ft Star Flyer will lead the charge with sailing trips from Southampton, England; Oslo, Norway;
In Boston Harbor, all eyes were on American skipper Terry Hutchinson this past holiday weekend as his Team Artemis Racing entered the final day of Extreme Racing with an 8-point lead. From July 30 through July 4, Artemis competed in a top-notch fleet of 11 Extreme 40 catamarans racing in Boston for Act 4 of the 2011 Extreme Sailing Series.Over the course of the weekend,
This article originally appeared in the December 2009 issueLook around a skippers’ meeting at a typical regatta and you’ll see all the usual suspects: seasoned salts, their families and a smattering of recent college grads or young adults sampling the sailing culture. The same folks populate most charter bases and destinations, which makes sense, considering the means and

The Chesapeake Bay

by Meredith Laitos, Posted June 13, 2011
When John Smith sailed into the Chesapeake Bay in 1607, he couldn’t have known the precedent he was setting. Ever since that early cruise, the area has been teeming with sailboats—everything from skipjacks dredging for oysters to race boats competing in regattas and flagships strutting their stuff at the United States Sailboat Show. With all of this on-water action, it’s no surprise that a dozen
School’s out, the boat’s in the water and the breeze is up. That means it is time for some summer cruising, and there are few things sweeter. From coast to coast, we want to know: what’s your favorite summer sailing destination? Newport, Rhode Island or Newport Beach, California? Green Bay or Biscayne Bay?In your own words, tell us about your favorite summer cruise. Send 300 words
For sailors, summer is many things: the height of racing season, the prime cruising months, and the precious window when days spent playing on the boat outnumber those spent working on it. It's also an excellent time to plan a charter vacation. With the kids out of school and the weather warming up, there are several great discounts to take advantage of. From ASA flotillas in

Medical Mariner

by Meredith Laitos, Posted May 31, 2011
Last spring, I was snorkeling near Sandy Spit in the BVI, entranced by the fish meandering through the coral heads. My snorkeling buddy gestured enthusiastically at a particularly bright betafish and together we zoomed to it like moths to a flame, unaware that it was headed for shallow water. Suddenly, a wave crashed over us, and we realized we were in trouble. Wave followed
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