by Clark Beek

Clark Beek, a frequent SAIL contributor, recently completed a circumnavigation aboard his 40ft ketch Condesa. He now sails out of San Francisco

Diesel Injector Surgery

by Clark Beek, Posted September 20, 2012
Servicing fuel injectors on a diesel engine is something most any boat owner can accomplish with a few basic tools. The job is especially easy because it really just involves getting the injectors out and sending them to a diesel shop.
Back in the day, each electronics unit aboard your boat did what it did, and never the twain did meet. Your depthsounder told you the depth, your radar showed what was around, your GPS told where you were, and so on. Today, of course, most electronics can be connected to onboard networks.
Tutorials about electrical systems and multimeters often involve theoretical analogies to flowing water. In these primers, the authors test well-designed, functioning circuits, and everything behaves exactly as anticipated.
As a marine electrician I’ve found that in-line fuse holders are the most common cause of problems I encounter with modern electronics equipment. Quality marine electronics are generally very reliable, as long as their electrical connections are sound and there is no voltage drop in the ship’s power supply. Unfortunately, all electronic devices come from the factory with in-line fuse holders on

Running the Ditch

by Clark Beek, Posted February 26, 2010
“The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco.” Conversations about San Francisco’s weather always lead to this Mark Twain quote. It’s doubtful whether he ever actually said it, but the sentiment rings true. The San Joaquin Valley, to the east, heats up to scorching temperatures by day and creates low pressure that draws cold air off the Pacific. The low point in the coastal

Ceviche and Process Knitting

by Clark Beek, Posted September 24, 2008
I heard various comments about Peru from other sailors as I cruised South America, usually to the effect of “Don’t even go near the coast. Stay at least fifty miles off.” These rumors undoubtedly date back to the 1980s heyday of Peru’s dictatorships and the Shining Path guerillas; Peru is now in fact a pretty tame place. Moreover, it has 1,500 miles of coastline, several key New World
  • facebook
  • twitter