by Wally Moran

An Arch for All Reasons

by Wally Moran, Posted January 2, 2014
Over the course of ten years of cruising, the aft end of my 34-foot Dufour, Gypsy Wind, had morphed from a clean and simple look to—well, a complex mess. First came the wind generator and its pole. The addition of a solar panel added another pole and crossbar, and of course there was the wiring for both units.
Last October, NOAA announced it was abandoning the chart-printing business. The last lithographic charts will roll off government presses on April 13. NOAA will continue to provide updated accurate “print on demand” (POD) charts, as well as PDF files, which users can print or download themselves, and will work with businesses that wish to print charts for resale.

Building a New Front End

by Wally Moran, Posted October 23, 2013
A liveaboard cruiser transforms his anchor handling system    
Cruisers heading down the ICW have a new navigational tool: The Great Book of Anchorages, from Beach House Publications. Authors Chuck Beier and Susan Landry describe more than 530 anchorages between Norfolk, VA, and the Florida Keys.

Sailing Post-Sandy

by Wally Moran, Posted February 11, 2013
Typically, by the time November rolls around, I’m well clear of the Northeast and headed south for the winter. This year, though, various factors delayed me, so that when Hurricane Sandy swept through in late October, I was still in Lake Erie.
There are two types of sailors: those who live for turquoise waters, sandy beaches and great sailing, and those who live for fabulous restaurants, trendy neighborhoods, convenient marinas...and great sailing.

ICW by the Numbers

by Wally Moran, Posted November 25, 2012
Everyone fears the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway the first time they attempt it. I know I did. I’d heard so many stories—about shoals, rough water, tricky inlets, narrow channels, aggressive tugboats.
I yearn to return to Tahiti. I was there in 2010 for the Pearl Regatta and fell in love with the islands. I can still hear the crash of surf outside my room that first night, smell the scent of orchids at the top of the mountain on Raiatea...
In April, reader Dennis Michaud wrote SAIL complaining about the “glorification” of sailors “traveling on a shoestring” while he got a PhD, taught at university and is now about to hire 500 people and purchase a custom yacht—and “pay the onerous yard bills.”
The cost of hiring a yard to repaint a 30- to 40-foot sailboat is likely to be over $10,000, which is uneconomical given the actual value of most older boats. The alternative, if you’re willing to put in long hours with a rotary sander, is doing it yourself.
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