by David Schmidt

David Schmidt, a SAIL editor-at-large, is a recent transplant to the Pacific Northwest from SAIL's Boston offices

Friendly Competition

by David Schmidt, Posted August 7, 2008
CREEEEEEEEEEK.Five heads snap toward the boom as an eerie sound emanates from the gooseneck on our Freedom 30. There were once four bolts binding the boom to the fitting, but now only two remain, and, judging from the groans of the metal-on-metal joint, this is one marriage that will likely be separated by death. And soon. “Traveler up, main out two inches,” barks Rod

Bound For Cruising

by David Schmidt, Posted August 6, 2008
Every sailor yearns to voyage beyond the horizon, but most of us have to settle for an annual cruise of a week or two. Make sure your boat is well prepared, and you’ll go far toward guaranteeing that you’ll spend your time trimming sails, chilling out in quiet anchorages, and enjoying early-morning swims rather than visiting the nearest boatyard. Know your boat “As a rule, every

Pocket Sword

by David Schmidt, Posted July 7, 2008
Pocket SwordIf you like folding knives with a million built-in gadgets, stop reading this review. But if you value exceptional workmanship, excellent quality materials, and the sharpest blade that this sailor has ever used — bar none — meet the Basic 3 from the studio of boutique knife maker David Boye. After using countless stainless-steel diving knives that always end

Trailer Envy

by David Schmidt, Posted May 22, 2008
If you own an older boat, finding the right trailer can be a chore, especially if the boat is no longer in production. Luckily, there’s a solution. Meet Brian Bishop, owner of a boutique sailboat trailer company called Sailboat Transporter. After spending some frustrating time seeking a reliable, reasonably priced trailer for his Islander 36, Bishop realized that a market niche existed, which he

Shambler

by David Schmidt, Posted May 8, 2008
“Ooohhh, is that a Rambler shirt?” It was a female sailor cooing to the rest of her all-female crew at Antigua Sailing Week as I walked past their charter boat at Jolley Harbor. Tempting but—I glued my eyes to the dock and kept right on walking, pretending that I hadn’t heard her comment. Not only am I happily married, I’m also a sailing journalist

The Named

by David Schmidt, Posted May 8, 2008
One of the closest-guarded secrets in American sailing circles has been the who’s-who roster for Puma Ocean Racing, Ken Read’s Puma-sponsored Volvo Open 70 team, the only U.S.-flagged entrant in the 2008/2009 Volvo Ocean Race. Many big names tried out for these 11 coveted spots, and Read has joked about receiving “death threats” from certain veteran ocean racers, should he pass them over for

New Cat, New Colors

by David Schmidt, Posted April 23, 2008
If you thought that the Puma Avanti — formerly ABN Amro Two — sported an unusual paint job, baby, you ain’t seen nothin’ yet. Really, how many boats can you think of that boast an asymmetrical paint job? Likely zero, but that’s exactly what Puma rolled out of Goetz Custom Boats’ yard in Bristol, Rhode Island on Monday evening. The boat, which has been

Bright Star

by David Schmidt, Posted April 18, 2008
Simply put, one-design racing doesn’t get more competitive than the venerable Star class. Take this year’s Worlds, held Miami, Florida. 104 Star boats from around the world arrived to battle for the title of the world’s best Star sailor, including names as big as Hamish Pepper, Robert Scheidt, and Mark Mendelblatt, but ultimately it was the Polish duo of Mateusz Kusznierewicz

New Race on the Block

by David Schmidt, Posted April 15, 2008
The Corinthians Association announced the starting date for a new, U.S. Sailing-sanctioned Category 2 distance race that will begin on Sunday, July 27, 2008 in the waters off Stonington, Connecticut. The Corinthians teamed up with the Stonington Harbor Yacht Club and the Boothbay Yacht Club (in Booth Bay, Maine) to offer a 332-nautical mile distance race that will end in the fabled lobstering

Meltdown

by David Schmidt, Posted March 19, 2008
Adventure annals are rife with mystery. Take George Mallory and Andrew Irving’s 1924 Mount Everest attempt; the two vanished, their fate murky until their mummified corpses were recently found. In sailing, what happened to Donald Crowhurst (and why) during the 1968–69 Golden Globe Race, the first nonstop solo-circumnavigation race, is equally ambiguous. His boat, Teignmouth Electron, was
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