by David Schmidt

David Schmidt, a SAIL editor-at-large, is a recent transplant to the Pacific Northwest from SAIL's Boston offices

Rather than junior sailing lessons, David Tunick, 68, of New York City, learned sailing by “on-the-job” experience. While his family drove powerboats, he and a friend bought a Lightning in 1966 and started “sleeping-bag cruising.”
Sailing has always been a priority for Elsie Hulsizer, 66, of Seattle, Washington. Her love affair with Northwest sailing was launched when she was 12 and her father built an 18-foot Robert’s Knockabout.
"We ran full-speed into something we weren’t expecting,” admitted Dean Brenner, the outgoing chairman of the U.S. Olympic Sailing Program, about the team’s performance at the 2012 Olympics in Weymouth, England.

Catching Up with Wendy Hinman

by David Schmidt, Posted September 12, 2012
Some cruisers wait for the perfect boat; others simply go. Wendy Hinman (48) and her husband, Garth Wilcox (52), of Seattle, Washington, paid off their mortgage early and just went.
Ned Cabot recently died in a tragic accident aboard Cielita along the coast of Newfoundland. The following interview took place in May. 
Growing up in a distinguished sailing family has its advantages, but as Sheila McCurdy discovered, nothing trumps experience. Her late father, Jim McCurdy (of McCurdy & Rhodes Naval Architects), loved racing, but mainly sailed offshore with clients until he designed Selkie, the family’s 38-foot sloop, in 1986.
For full 2012 Olympics coverage, read on and make sure to click the links for more on the team, the competition, the venue and changes in the approach to U.S. Olympic sailing.
Misty clouds clung to the evergreen-clad hillsides of San Juan Island, the largest and westernmost island in its namesake archipelago in the Pacific Northwest. Whip-like strands of kelp were shepherded by the currents of Haro Strait...
Henry “Hank” Strauss, still tack-sharp at 97, had to give up sailing solo a few years back but still regularly gets out on San Francisco Bay with friends. His lifetime in sailing spans the evolution of cruising under sail as we know it. 
For years, you’ve watched raceboats strut around the buoys, their crews tweaking lines or pulling off well-choreographed maneuvers requiring hours of practice and polish. While cruising may be your raison d’être, you can’t help but notice that racers know how to really make a boat go, a useful skill for any sailor.
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