by Peter Nielsen

Peter Nielsen is SAIL’s Editor-in-Chief.

The last year has been kind to cruising-cat aficionados; most established builders have introduced new models, and some yards are showing their wares in the United States for the first time.
They say every cruiser turns into a racer when there’s another boat in the vicinity. I’m not so sure that’s true.

Just Launched: Petrel

by Peter Nielsen, Posted January 4, 2013
It is not very often that Hull #2 of a design beats Hull #1 onto the water by a couple of decades—which is why Jay E. Paris, longtime technical editor of SAIL and designer of the 32-foot cruiser Petrel, laughs ruefully as he looks back at the lengthy build timeline of his boat.

Best Stern Anchors

by Peter Nielsen, Posted November 29, 2012
If you’re getting into serious cruising, there will be times when you want to set a stern anchor. Usually this involves emptying fenders, lines and whatnot out of a cockpit locker until you unearth the kedge and its rode.
One challenge with older boats that have been out of production for decades is obtaining replacements for components that may have been custom-made back in the day. Good luck finding a new bow pulpit for your 1974 Flexiflyer 43 or a mast cap for the rig on your 1967 Brickouthouse 29.
hese days, it’s becoming rare for a production boat—no matter how good it is—to survive more than a few seasons before falling victim to the perceived demands of the market for newer, fresher, ever more modern styling.
Eskimos, according to urban legend, have 32 words for snow. Or perhaps it’s nine, or 15. No matter. Tongans must have at least that many words for the color blue.
You’re about to read a sneak preview of a sharp-looking new performance cruiser from Island Packet. Yes, you read it right—that Island Packet, the one renowned for tough, long-keeled, bluewater cruising yachts.

Finely Poised

by Peter Nielsen, Posted September 20, 2012
Cue jokes about how perfectly balanced Jeanneaus are… this Sun Odyssey 40’s skipper fell afoul of the long sandspit at the entrance to the River Hamble, on England’s south coast, one night in April.

Curse of the Cursor

by Peter Nielsen, Posted September 18, 2012
The first time I ever used a GPS on an offshore passage we almost lost the boat. The navigator, delighted with his new toy, had plotted a waypoint just off our destination, but somehow missed the long, low, unlit headland between us and it.
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