by Peter Nielsen

Peter Nielsen is SAIL’s Editor-in-Chief.

South African builder Robertson and Caine consistently hits the mark with its cruising/charter cats, designed by American firm Morrelli & Melvin. The new 44 combines practicality, volume and decent performance in a capable-looking package.  

Impeller Etiquette

by Peter Nielsen, Posted November 16, 2011
Get to grips with an often over-looked but vital part of an engine cooling system in this step by step procedure

Draft Dodger

by Peter Nielsen, Posted October 31, 2011
Britain’s boatbuilding industry is a shadow of what it was back in the 1970s and 80s, but a handful of boutique yards still thrives around its shores. One such is Northshore Yachts, whose Southerly range has survived four decades of the boom-and-bust cycles that saw once-mighty production brands tumble.

New Boats Debut at Fall Shows

by Peter Nielsen, Posted September 30, 2011
It’s fall, and boat show season is upon us. It kicked off on the East Coast with the Newport International Boat Show, in France with the Grand Pavois de La Rochelle, and in England with the Southampton Boat Show. A jetlagged Peter Nielsen visited all three in one week. Here’s what he saw…  

Take the Load Off

by Peter Nielsen, Posted September 27, 2011
For several years we sailed our 34ft sloop without feeling the need for a windlass. The weight of the ground tackle—a 22-pound Delta anchor, 70 feet of 5/16in hi-test chain and 200 feet of nylon rode—was seldom an issue in the shallow anchorages we tend to frequent. But I’ve been involved in enough anchoring dramas to know that for more ambitious cruising, an electric windlass

Over The Edge

by Peter Nielsen, Posted September 26, 2011
It is sadly ironic that my musings last month on the nature of risk in sailing—and our acceptance of it— should be followed by the tragic capsize of the Kiwi 35 WingNuts (see page 16) in the Chicago Mackinac Race, and a little later by the maxi-racer Rambler 100 turning turtle in the Fastnet race after its keel fell off and plummeted to the bottom of the Irish Sea.The

Corsair Sprint 750 MK II

by Peter Nielsen, Posted September 14, 2011
This fast folding-wing trimaran is in its second incarnation, with a revised deck plan and rig and larger amas to improve sailing satisfaction and performance. Not changed: the adrenaline rush that comes with double-digit sailing speeds! corsairmarine.comSPECSLOA: 24ft 4inLWL: 23ft 1inBeam (folded)
The Aquila 45 integrates IRC (International Racing Class) design features in a comfortably sized inshore/offshore racer-cruiser. Despite its high performance the boat is specifically configured to accommodate short-handed sailing. aquilasailingyachts.com   SPECS LOA: 43ft, 8in Beam: 13ft 9in Displacement:
The Island Packet 360 continues the company tradition with a look that combines the modern and the traditional, and a cruiser-friendly “Full Foil Keel” below the waterline and a Hoyt Boom on the foredeck. The result is a boat that works equally well for weekend cruising or a bluewater passage. ipy.com   SPECS LOA: 36ft
The latest in the new Catalina line that began with the 445 in early 2009, the Catalina 385 includes a moderate beam carried well aft for a spacious cockpit, modest freeboard for reduce windage and a comfortable, practical interior belowdecks. catalinayachts.com
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