by Kimball Livingston

All on assignment, Kimball Livingston has sailed the oceans blue. And he's been to Fink, Texas, too.

41 Years in the Saddle

by Kimball Livingston, Posted November 30, 2010
And there it is, the December issue of SAIL, the first issue in the history of the magazine that does not bear the name Charles E. Mason III on the masthead. “Chip” as his oldest friends call him, was a founding editor. Issue number one hit the stands in February, 1970 and I do mean hit. There is a whole generation of sailors
Ross Stein, who races Corsair 24 #357, Origami, out of San Francisco Bay, sends this report from Italy’s big, crazy, beautiful Barcolana race, or Coppa d’Autunno. With turnouts in the thousands for a course only 19 miles long, there’s not much that compares. The race is sailed in the Gulf of Trieste, with one of four marks laid in the waters of neighboring

A Brand of Brothers

by Kimball Livingston, Posted September 21, 2010
I am pretty sure the Johnstone brothers never imagined creating anything so very successful as the J/Boats, Inc., that we know today. But imagining success on some level—that would come naturally to Rod, the designer and to Bob, the marketer. Long before J/Boats became the Johnstone family business, sailing was a family passion. Then came a case of left brain meeting right brain and—Don’t
There is much to be absorbed in Monday’s announcements by the Defender and the Challenger of Record for America’s Cup 34. Beyond the anticipated headliner that 72-foot, wingsailed catamarans are the platform of choice, I note that the latest documents open up some wiggle room regarding venue. Gone is the draft language stipulating that the challenger eliminations will be sailed in the waters of
In a move that is sure to energize and inspire the sailors of San Francisco Bay, Larry Ellison's BMW Oracle Racing team today announced that it is no longer entertaining bids from other US cities hoping to host America's Cup 34. San Francisco, home to the winning Golden Gate Yacht Club, is now the only city in the USA under consideration.The team, with the America's Cup in tow,
No matter where you go in the world it’s “never like this” when they switch the weather on. So it goes with distance events as well. The 2010 edition of the Singlehanded Transpac has been slow going much of the time, with difficult seas and opposing sets kicked up by distant storms. A thirteen-day crossing is certainly not the best-possible time for a
Walking toward his ride for the solo Transpac, Ronnie Simpson slowed us down to point out that the mast of his 30-footer is taller than the mast of the 35-footer next door. I like this guy. He made one fast passage through youth—Enlisted in the Marines. Got blown up by an RPG in a firefight outside Fallujah at age 19. Medi-vac’d out in a coma. Slowly, eventually, recovered (enough).
Tania Elias Calles is one tough Laser sailor. In March she went to great lengths—about 300 miles—draw attention to the sailing in her native waters, and invite racers from abroad to train with her in Mexico on Bahia de Banderas in the run-up to the Pan Am Games, which will be held there in 2011.Although Calles had a support vessel escorting her, she was otherwise entirely on her own,
Giant, wing-masted trimarans in the America’s Cup, hydrofoilers busting 50 knots in the Med, these innovations open a window onto a gee-whiz future that turns me on. But they don’t answer one question: Will we, or will we not in that future, still have with us the racing classics of yore?For every Dorade that inspires another and then another deep-pockets hero to
No, you can’t park it in your driveway yet, but the 19 designers who met today in Valencia put rubber on the road toward a decision on what kind of boat we’ll be racing in America’s Cup 34, monohull or multihull. Beyond the tradeoffs, priorities and passions that might pop up in any barside conversation anwhere, these people were concerned with matters such as the ease of shipping these new
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