by Kimball Livingston

All on assignment, Kimball Livingston has sailed the oceans blue. And he's been to Fink, Texas, too.

Originally published March 2009The last time Ragtime tied up at my local marina, I wandered down to the dock, admired the varnish, and grinned at the dinky cabin. But most of all I admired the audacity of those long, skinny, hard-chined lines drawn by New Zealander John Spencer a few years before the boat, as Infidel, was denied entry to the 1967
Bill Schock, the founder of California-based W.D. Schock Corp., got a lot of things right in his time, not the least of which when he turned to his son Tom back in 1976 and said, “It’s a great little boat. Let’s build it.” In this way the Santana 20 was born with, as Tom recalls it, “no demographic studies, no market research, nothing. We didn’t know who we’d sell it to.”Thirty-five years
It had to start somewhere, or you could say it had to end somewhere—those long nights in “the room,” the protest room, haggling over the fine points with never enough evidence to establish the facts and you know that much is true because if you had the facts the hearing would be over in a minute.On-the-water umpiring revolutionized the high-end game, and that’s what got

A Perfect 45?

by Kimball Livingston, Posted March 23, 2011
Adopting wing-sailed catamarans, inventing a new tour called the America’s Cup World Series, launching a 45-foot one-design class as a training fleet: none of this could ever have been free of controversy. The 45s went from concept—a trainer for AC sailors and race committee alike—to reality in five months, with the first “batch” of four promised for delivery to challenging teams by April 1.
They’re mad as hell and they’re going to take it.Sitting in the harbor at Mal, capital of the Maldives, once home to kings, the skipper of the Kelly Peterson 46 , Esprit, reports, “The country offers a $350 cruising package to visit the other islands, but we are going to sit right here with fifteen other boats that have decided not to do the

Remaking History

by Kimball Livingston, Posted March 11, 2011
It’s a good bet that Starling Burgess, when drawing the lines for his 1934 America’s Cup defender Rainbow, never imagined that a new Rainbow would be almost ready to launch 77 years later. Or that a new version of his 1937 defender, Ranger, would be already sailing. But the J Class represents the epitome of beauty and elegance under sail, and because of that, the Js are back. Six
OK, I’m not above stretching a headline to get your attention. But history should record that on February 11, 2011, the first tests of the new America’s Cup sports graphics system were conducted in South San Francisco Bay, using volunteer Cal 40s and a rented helicopter.They woulda done it on the cityfront, in America’s Cup-racing waters, but the City of San Francisco is not

The Stan Honey How-To

by Kimball Livingston, Posted February 3, 2011
The giant trimaran that holds the round-the-world sailing record, with the speed to hop from weather system to weather system, and the even larger—suddenly crippled—trimaran that is out there now trying to beat that record . . .“Are fragile,” says Stan Honey. “The premise is to build a china cup that is extraordinarily fast in flat water and 25 knots of breeze. You use the boat’s
Dateline MiamiWhat you won’t get, if you’re not part of it, is this. Larry Ellison’s team is going to be just as disappointed as I am if the 34th America’s Cup match is not sailed on San Francisco Bay. I’ve heard them out. I’ve looked into their eyes. I wish I could convey the sense of disappointment if—The amphitheatre, the reliable breeze, the stuff you’ve heard before,
Would-be America's Cup teams around the world are eyeing City Hall, San Francisco as Cup-in-SF proponents prepare to make their case before the Budget and Finance Subcommittee of the city's Board of Supervisors. That hearing will take place on Wednesday. Negotiations have been going on for months, and it's crunch time.On the opposite side of the globe, meanwhile, fabricators are working
  • facebook
  • twitter