Projects

Repairing Wooden Rubrails and Toerails

by Paul Calder, Posted December 19, 2014
Thanks to the high cost of marine lumber and a growing aversion to brightwork maintenance, fewer new boats these days have wooden rubrails or toerails. This is understandable—wood is pricey to install and, if finished bright, is a lot of work to maintain.
Installing shore power on a cruising boat is an easy and relatively inexpensive project, as long as you have basic DIY skills, can read a manual and are realistic about your needs. If you’re just planning to live aboard your boat in a marina and want to run appliances like a heater, a fan, a TV and a blender (hey—why not?), then you can get by with a simple installation that will set you back just a few hundred bucks if you do the work yourself.   
A survey of the boat in question immediately after an electrician—and I use the term advisedly—had installed a battery charger, I got to the battery compartment and was faced with the snake’s nest you see here...
A stitch in time truly saves nine when it comes to diesel maintenance. By taking a few easy steps, you can go a long way toward ensuring that you won't be plagued by engine problems when on passage.
The phrase “out of sight, out of mind” is all too true where boats are concerned, and some of the systems that are out of sight on a typical sailboat can really ruin your day—or your season. Take the exhaust mixing elbow, for example—and give yourself a pat on the back for actually knowing what it is.
One day I discovered the romantically named Belt Tension Jack. Suddenly belt tensioning not only lost all its emotional tension, it even acquired a certain elegance.
When we were sailing from the small French island of St. Pierre off Newfoundland before making landfall in Crookhaven, Ireland, 2,000 miles to the east. At the time, Arcturus was the first boat to cross an ocean fitted with Dynex Dux synthetic rigging
Along with a watertight hull and robust steering gear, there’s a third prerequisite for seaworthy sailboats: strong standing rigging. Before the round-Atlantic voyage we’re now partway through, I worked hard to ensure our Valiant 40 Moon River was up to speed in the first two departments.

Eco-friendly Antifouling

by Adam Cort, Posted April 17, 2014
Find the eco-friendly antifoul to best repel shells, slime and critters from attaching themselves to the hull. We'll give the pros and cons to help you choose which one will work best for your boat.

Hand–Tailored Sail Repair

by Rudy and Jill Sechez, Posted April 9, 2014
Seamanship: “All of the arts and skills of boathandling, ranging from maintenance and repairs, to piloting, sail handling, marlinspike work, rigging and all aspects of boat operation.”
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