Cruising

Heavy Weather Strategies When Sailing a Catamaran

by Peter Johnstone, Posted July 30, 2014
By their nature, larger catamarans are exceptionally safe offshore. It is not unusual to sail through mildly uncomfortable conditions, such as a gale, only to arrive in port and hear sailors on keelboats talk of “surviving” horrendous weather. A large modern catamaran has plenty of buoyancy and exceptional roll inertia.

Interior Design in a Boat Doesn't Have to be Nautical

by Cindy Wallach, Posted April 21, 2014
Just Say No to “Nautical” And other interior design tricks to transform your multihull into a more livable space.
Each fall, many East Coast sailors make the pilgrimage south to warmer waters along one of two well-known paths: offshore direct to the islands, or inshore via the Intracoastal Waterway. 

Yvan Bourgnon Solo Sailing a Catamaran Around the World

by Liesbet Collaert, Posted September 18, 2014
“Why don’t we find out?” I volunteered. Having a little chat with strangers while sailing can be entertaining, so I picked up the VHF and in my best French asked who was trying to call us.

Sail-camping on a Hobie 16

by Robert F. Burgess, Posted June 19, 2014
In the Florida Panhandle, Robert Burgess and his friend Doug decided to try a tricky weekend sail into a part of St. Andrew Bay, near Panama City, where sailboats never go.

How to Turn Your Cat into a Gym

by Mike and Rebecca Sweeney, Posted May 23, 2014
Before we started sailing, we ran a full-time martial arts gym, so having ample space to exercise was a priority when boat shopping. In fact, that was one of the reasons why we selected Zero To Cruising, our PDQ 32 catamaran, instead of a monohull.
I distinctly remember the first time I ever sailed a cruising multihull. It was a gray summer morning on England’s south coast, and a frigid 25-knot easterly was putting the boot into a fast-running east-going tide, kicking up walls of water that clashed and fell in all directions.

Brazil's Costa Verde

by Gordon Moon, Posted April 29, 2014
They arrive around mid-morning. A solitary motorboat cruises in, then two, then a dozen. Soon there is a steady line approaching over the horizon. They anchor stern-to along the beach, rafted up three, four and five rows deep. Soon the music starts, a jumble of competing rhythms.
From a family of five cruising the South Pacific, to a pair of exercise fanatics filming work-out videos on their Caribbean-based cat, to a solo sailor exploring the Exumas on his trimaran, these liveaboard cruisers decided that two (or three) hulls were better than one when it came to creating a life at sea. 
For five years, Marlene and I have left Kansas City each May to board Different Drummer, our 39-foot Prout Escale catamaran, at the River Dunes, North Carolina, and set out for six months of sailing. It’s not always blueberries and chocolate ice cream, but I wouldn’t trade it for the world.
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