Racing News

The 2013 Atlantic Cup wrapped up this weekend with its third and final leg of racing in Narragansett Bay. Winner of legs one and two, #118 Bodacious Dream, secured first place overall. 
This past Sunday, Emirates Team New Zealand won its ninth consecutive race of the Louis Vuitton Cup, the America’s Cup Challenger Series, cementing its status as the top team in the challengers’ series.
Meanwhile, over in Falmouth, England, no less than 11 wing-sailed catamarans are taking to the air in the International C class Catamaran Championship regatta—or “Little America’s Cup,” as it’s more commonly known.

Star Class Isn't Dead Yet

by Adam Cort, Posted February 21, 2014
The Star class may no longer have a spot in the Olympics, but that hardly seems to have slowed it down. On the contrary, with the advent of the new Star Sailors League—a pro series featuring some of the best sailors in the world—the future of the 100-year-old one design appears to be stronger than ever.
“Everything on board is wet, more than two weeks I wear my survival clothes."
This year’s Sevenstar Round Britain and Ireland Race was a wild one from the very start—which was postponed 21 hours to allow Tropical Storm Bertha, a low-pressure system packing 50-knot gusts, to pass through before the fleet jumped off.
Double-handed skippers Alex Thomson (UK) and Pepe Ribes (ESP), sailing aboard the IMOCA 60 Hugo Boss, suffered calamity when they were dismasted during the nonstop, around-the-globe Barcelona World Race (BWR) in January, 370 miles off the Brazilian coast.
“If you’re making 25 knots upwind and 40 knots downwind, tacking on someone and gassing them just isn’t happening,” Cayard says. “In seriously-overpowered boats, the match will be about who can actually get the boat around the course and figure out how to avoid that extra gybe that costs you maybe 20 seconds, maybe 250 meters.”
The demise of the Audi MedCup for 2012 not only ended one of the most successful and long-running commercial events in sailing, it also led us to ponder the future of high-profile sponsored sailing. Can it actually deliver good value for sponsors?
In 2003, Robert Miller and his monohull Mary Cha IV set the world speed record for sailing from New York to Cape Lizard, at 6 days, 17 hours, 52 minutes and 39 seconds. Giovanni Soldini and his crew aboard Maserati are now looking to shatter it.
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