Racing News

In light of the recent accident during the 2012 Farallones Race, US Sailing has created an Independent Review Panel that will be investigating the factors that contributed to the tragedy, at the request of the US Coast Guard.
Four sailors lost their lives in the 2012 Ensenada Race—a first in the history of that event as well—just 15 days after the accident up north. The double whammy stunned the sailing community, coming only 11 months after the two fatalities, under very different circumstances...

Full Report on Farallones Race Tragedy

by Sail Staff, Posted August 9, 2012
US Sailing has released a full report on the Farallones race accident, along with the following press release. See what one of our editors had to say on the topic at Sailfeed.com.
In the August, 2012 issue, you might have read a story about my first time flying a spinnaker in a college regatta.  I returned to the same offshore regatta in Larchmont, New York, this year, excited to perfect the craft of downwind speed.

Letter of the Month: Who's to Blame?

by Rod Glover, Posted December 20, 2012
The lack of yachting medals in the recent Olympics will undoubtedly spawn many letters and articles. David Schmidt's column "What Went Wrong" in the October 2012 issue of SAIL is not the first and will not be the last.

A New Bacardi Cup

by Adam Cort, Posted February 28, 2013
Now in its fourth year, Bacardi Miami Sailing Week is fast becoming one of the premier sportboat regattas of the winter southern circuit.
Although flush-deck sliding foredeck hatches are great for quickly launching and retrieving kites, they have typically been prone to leak because of the difficulty in creating proper seals around them—until now. Among the many innovative features aboard the new McConaghy 38 one-design sloop is a pneumatic seal for the offset (port side) sliding hatch that has an inflatable “bladder” encircling the hatch aperture to keep the wet out. 

2013 OSTAR Finishes Up

by Adam Cort, Posted June 19, 2013
It’s good to see that some things stay the same. Chief among these is the OSTAR, the legendary event that basically invented the modern sport of singlehanded ocean racing.
Wing sails? Check. Full foiling? Check. Crash helmets? Check and check.
In the end it was Taylor Canfield’s USone team that carried WAKA Racing skipper Phil Robertson on its shoulders as part of his victory celebration—despite the fact that it had been Robertson who’d knocked them out of Malaysia’s Monsoon Cup just hours earlier.  
  • facebook
  • twitter