Projects

Anti-siphon valves

by Dick Everett, Posted August 4, 2009

Beat the Wrap

by Peter Nielsen, Posted April 12, 2011
The last thing you want from your furling gear is for it to jam up in a rising breeze—or ever. I must be some kind of roller-reefing Jonah, because it’s happened a few times on boats I’ve been sailing aboard. On two of those occasions, halyard wrap was to blame.Halyard wrap sounds like something you’d tear off a new piece of rope, but it’s actually the most common cause of

Furl it Up

by Charles J. Doane, Posted January 6, 2012
After cruisers tested and perfected furler systems about 30 years ago,  they were widely adopted on certain types of raceboats. Since then, however, there’s been an interesting reverb effect, in which offshore racers have created ever more refined and versatile furling technologies that are now trickling back into the cruising community.
On August 23, 2011, our 35-foot Allied Seabreeze yawl Arcturus (vintage 1966) became—we believe—the first monohull to cross an ocean sporting Colligo Dynex Dux synthetic fiber standing rigging. This after a 3,000-mile passage.

Ask Sail: Seeing Green

by Don Casey, Posted March 15, 2013
One of the stainless steel chainplates on my Olson 911S is tinted green both above and below deck. The fasteners that bolt the plate to the internal bulkhead do not show the same condition.

What to Know About Varnishing in Winter

by John Arrufat, Posted January 7, 2014
As a Christmas gift to myself, I asked Hans, my Norwegian cabinet-maker friend, to build some new upgrades for my old and beloved 1968 Venture 21. These included drop boards for the companionway, a bulkhead liner for the V-berth and a mounting board for a bilge pump, all of which he delivered on time to my dock in Olympia, Washington, rough-sanded and ready.

Adding Mast Pulpits

by Peter Dubler, Posted August 21, 2008
Call me old-fashioned, call me daring, call me crazy, but I prefer not to have my cockpit full of lines that have been led aft. I enjoy going forward and working at the mast. It hasn’t always been that way. During my first crossing from Isla Mujeres, Mexico, to the Dry Tortugas off Florida many years ago as crew on an Irwin 38, each trip forward was a crawl on my hands and knees. Oh, how I

The forgotten details

by Nigel Calder, Posted April 15, 2009
I often hear from people who, after years of preparation, have set out on their first ocean crossing with a high degree of confidence in their boats. Then something really disconcerting happens—say, the propeller shaft disappears out of the back of the boat. It’s quite a confidence shaker. I’ve heard enough of these stories to be able to identify several easily prevented but potentially

Water power

by Nigel Calder, Posted August 17, 2009
My last two columns discussed the high cost of generating electricity with a diesel engine and the relatively short payback period for solar panels on liveaboard cruising boats. The problem with solar is that it requires a lot of surface area to produce significant amounts of power. This is relatively easy to find on catamarans, but not so on monohulls.Coincidentally, I received an email
High-quality, long-lasting impellers from JMP are manufactured from a mix of different rubbers and include a surface coating that decreases wear and tear for longer use.Tested by the U.S. Navy, the impellers help keep marine engines working at their highest efficiency, even in harsh operating conditions, by ensuring that their pumps are operating correctly.JMP offers flexible
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