Projects

Learning to Do It Yourself

by Dean Abramson, Posted January 10, 2013
I never used to read how-to articles in sailing magazines. They were too daunting. I might want to build a thingie or fix a whatnot, but a few paragraphs in, I would learn that success was possible only if certain conditions were met.

Bosun’s Box, from A to Z

by Mark Corke, Posted August 28, 2013
Carrying everything from extra nuts and bolts to blocks and batteries could be essential to the safety of your boat. 
The phrase “out of sight, out of mind” is all too true where boats are concerned, and some of the systems that are out of sight on a typical sailboat can really ruin your day—or your season. Take the exhaust mixing elbow, for example—and give yourself a pat on the back for actually knowing what it is.

Gravity Theory

by Peter Nielsen, Posted December 9, 2008
Smell. Pong. Effluvium. Whichever way you describe it, the airborne essence emanating from Ostara’s aged sanitation system was highly unpleasant. More than just an odor but thankfully short of a full-blown stench, it permeated the forepeak and almost caused a spousal mutiny during our first weekend aboard. No doubt about it – something had to be done.The sanitation system comprised a

Keel improvements

by Peter Nielsen, Posted June 22, 2009
Jabberwock, the BoatWorks project O’Day 25, was looking very scruffy around the underparts. The boat had been standing for so long that most of the paint had just fallen off the bottom, and the keel was looking particularly seedy. There was no way we could launch the boat with the keel in such bad condition. It was time for a makeover. A proper keel job done by a boatyard will cost

Filter Your Fuel Off-line

by Chuck Husick, Posted June 15, 2010
It’s essentially true that if you give a marine diesel engine clean oil, clean air and clean fuel, it will run, if not forever, then certainly for longer than you are likely to own your boat. Using good-quality diesel oil and changing out the oil and oil filter at the manufacturer-recommended time intervals—typically every 200 hours—is a good first step. Similarly, if the air intake is correctly

A Head Start

by Don Casey, Posted September 27, 2011
When your boat spends the winter on the hard, relaunching in the spring will go easier, and perhaps happen sooner, if you tackle a few of your pre-launch tasks during the fall and winter months. Some of these are jobs you might otherwise neglect or skip in the rush to launch. And the nice part is you get to mess about doing boat things during the off-season.
Nothing will ruin your cruise faster than a damaged or torn sail. With the BoatWorks sail-repair kit on board, you’ll be able to make emergency repairs and keep on sailing. Ours cost less than $100 to assemble but could save us hundreds in repair bills.

Bottom Paint 101

by Mark Corke, Posted May 22, 2013
If you live in a warm climate and the boat stays in all year, you should keep a close eye on its underbody
A stitch in time truly saves nine when it comes to diesel maintenance. By taking a few easy steps, you can go a long way toward ensuring that you won't be plagued by engine problems when on passage.
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