Boats

Xp 38

by Tom Dove, Posted September 4, 2013
While people do occasionally cross oceans in dinghies, race around the buoys aboard schooners and entertain their friends on racing catamarans, most of us try to match our boats more closely to our needs.

SAIL's Best Boats 2014: Atlantic 47

by SAIL Editors, Posted November 21, 2013
Although huge, full-roached mainsails have been the rule on most catamarans for years now, in real life we all know that many cruising-cat sailors don’t ever use them because they can be so hard to handle. 

Moorings 5800

by Charles J. Doane, Posted March 6, 2014
A stately cruising cat worthy of a potentate

Hallberg-Rassy 54

by Sail Staff, Posted January 16, 2006
Construction has begun on this new 54-foot center-cockpit design from German Frers, and the first yacht in the series is expected at the end of August. There’s an owner’s cabin aft and two guest cabins forward. Construction is glass with PVC core except in the keel area, which is solid-glass laminate. Spars and rod rigging are by Seldn, and the auxiliary is a 110-horsepower Volvo diesel. A

Baltic 79

by Sail Staff, Posted January 18, 2006
Delivered to an Italian owner last year, this carbon-composite hull has a lifting keel that can reduce draft from 14 feet, 9 inches to less than 10 feet. The rig includes a new “canoe” boom that is supposed to be easier to use and store the mainsail better than the more traditional wide, flat Park Avenue boom. The nonoverlapping jib makes the yacht easy to handle, and the

Shipman 63

by Sail Staff, Posted January 18, 2006
When their carbon/epoxy-hulled 50-footer was launched two years ago, it was named European Boat of the Year. But the Shipman design team has decided there is also a need for a yacht in the 60-foot range that can make offshore passages quickly and effortlessly. The result is this pilothouse design the Shipman team is calling “the racer’s ocean cruiser.” The lightweight

True Wind 32

by Bill Springer, Posted September 22, 2004
The True Wind 32 presents an interesting amalgamation of features. It's a 32-foot cat with a rigid open bridgedeck and is built to sail faster than wind speed in the right conditions, to provide the amenities of a pocket cruiser, and to be capable of easily folding up onto a street-legal trailer.During my test on Florida's Biscayne Bay in 10 knots of breeze and flat water, we hit 8 knots on

Hoyt H-10

by Bill Springer, Posted September 21, 2006
You’ll find Opti-mists and 420s on many yacht-club docks, but hasn’t the time come for a more modern small-boat design? Designer Garry Hoyt thinks so. His new H-10 is designed to be a stable, fast, and fun dinghy that will fill the gap between the Opti and bigger boats like the Laser and 420. To keep the boat light and easy for a kid to handle alone, the 10-foot-long hull is

Kanter 47

by Sail Staff, Posted September 29, 2006
This yacht was built for Jim Stephen, an avid one-design sailor who wanted good speed under sail, plus plenty of legroom for his family when they are cruising. The result is this moderate-displacement centerboard sloop designed by naval architect Dieter Empacher and built in aluminum at Kanter Yachts in St. Thomas, Ontario. The raised deckhouse and large windows create a spacious and well-lit

Open 5.70

by Bill Springer, Posted May 11, 2007
With its flat, plane-friendly Groupe Finot hull shape, dual rudders, square-headed full-batten main, and lifting, narrow-chord bulb keel, the Open 5.7 is obviously designed for the high-end of the performance spectrum. It’s only 20 feet long, displaces merely 1,020 pounds (330 pounds are in the keel), and boasts a working sail area of 280 square feet. Off the wind the 5.7 carries a
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