Boats

SAIL's Best Boats 2014: Gunboat

by SAIL Editors, Posted November 21, 2013
Gunboat catamarans are known for their sleek lines and speed. Owners take pride in sailing their boats, and the engines are used primarily for maneuvering and intermittent auxiliary propulsion-; they are rarely used for extended motoring.
When it’s January in Germany, all roads lead to Düsseldorf. At least they do if you’re a boat person. You can look over a hundred-foot motoryacht that’s been plucked from the nearby Rhine river, paddle a canoe on an intricately landscaped mock river, cast a fly on an alpine stream, get rescued from an overturned Opti on a manmade lake, outfit yourself in bargain-basement foulweather gear or put a deposit on a new sailboat—all without stepping outdoors and all before your lunchtime bowl of goulash.

Hanse 531

by Duncan Kent, Posted October 8, 2004
Hanse Yachts in Greifswald, in eastern Germany, was little heard of until the 1990s, when reunification allowed the yard to break into the worldwide production-boat market. Hanse has built fast cruising boats from 31 to 41 feet and recently launched its largest model, the 53-foot 531 that I tested off Cannes, France, this summer.On DeckThe 531's deck layout is

Vitters 140

by Sail Staff, Posted June 2, 2005
Last spring Vitters Shipyard launched this 140-foot aluminum sloop designed by Ed Dubois. Built to MCA standards, the yacht is a refinement of other DuBois designs in this size range. The contemporary birch interior by Dick Young Designs is exceptionally well finished. Bulkheads are brushed stainless steel with oiled- teak surrounds, and all the bathrooms have floating teak

e33

by Peter Nielsen, Posted March 3, 2006
A sailmaker, a boatbuilder, and a naval architect are standing at a bar having a quiet drink… no, this isn’t yet another incarnation of an old joke. It’s how sailmaker Robbie Doyle explains the genesis of the e33, a collaboration between him, builder Dirk Kneulman, and designer Jeremy Wurmfeld. Talk turned to the declining state of one-design racing and of what type of boat it would take to

Beneteau 523

by Bill Springer, Posted August 23, 2006
Groupe Beneteau is the largest sailboat manufacturer in the world. It comprises four separate companies—Beneteau, Jeanneau, Lagoon, and CNB—that operate independently but share economies of scale. At first glance, Beneteau and Jeanneau may appear to be competing for the same buyers, but in reality each line is designed to fill wide (and separate) swaths in the marketplace. Jeanneau has had great

Waterwitch 48

by Charles Mason, Posted September 28, 2006
As president of the New York Jets football team, Jay Cross puts in his share of long hours. When it’s time to decompress, chances are he’ll be found out on the water. That’s nothing new. As a young sailor, Cross competed in 470 dinghies at the Olympic level and also designed and raced International 14s; in the early ‘80s his Cross III design was a world standard for the class. But his subsequent

Barracuda 105

by Sail Staff, Posted October 5, 2006
The design concept behind this motorsailer, constructed at Barcos Deportivos Yard in Spain, is to maximize space on deck and below. The cockpit is wide, and the airy feeling below is enhanced by large windows in both the hull and the superstructure. The upper saloon is effectively a continuation of the cockpit. A permanent bimini is installed over the cockpit, which has separate dining and

Laser SB3

by Bill Springer, Posted October 17, 2007
The SB3 (stands for sportboat for three people), hugely popular in Europe, made its American debut at the Annapolis sailboat show earlier this month. It seems to have hit the elusive target that sportboat designers shoot for—a fun, fast, durable, and reasonably affordable raceboat. To that end, there’s some carbon used in the bowsprit and foils, but the rest of the boat uses tried-and-true

Alerion Express 33

by Bill Springer, Posted August 8, 2008
Daysailers are back. They’re not the low-cost, first-step, “let’s learn to sail” boats of the 1970s, but instead are elegant, classic-looking upscale little yachts for experienced skippers who have steadily moved up to cruisers over the years and now seek something simpler. The Alerion Express 33 fills a gap in that company’s line of 20- to 38-foot daysailers.     On Deck•
  • facebook
  • twitter