Boats

Five… four… three… two… one! The crack of the starting gun comes clearly over the radio, echoed a split second later by the real sound. Aboard Sojana, helmsman Poule Hoj-Jensen and Capt. Lionel Pean watch smaller boats take advantage of holes in the line to cross ahead of the 115-foot Farr-designed yacht.
hese days, it’s becoming rare for a production boat—no matter how good it is—to survive more than a few seasons before falling victim to the perceived demands of the market for newer, fresher, ever more modern styling.

Flagships Gallery: Morris Yachts M46

by Sail Staff, Posted April 1, 2013
Nothing stimulates the senses and stirs the soul quite like the new M-Series M46 from Morris Yachts. Whether you are charging to windward like a thoroughbred, or stargazing from the large cockpit in a still anchorage, the M46 is more than just a boat. 

Life at 55

by Dennis Caprio, Posted July 2, 2013
Is 55 the new 45—feet, that is? In much the same way that advances in healthcare have allowed us to feel younger than our years, technological innovations in sailhandling gear and mechanical propulsion have made yachts 50 to 60 feet long a breeze to sail, dock or anchor, even for sailors whose ages are approaching that of their boats’ LOA.
Every year, we here at SAIL magazine wonder how the boatbuilding industry is going to top the previous year’s effort, and every year the industry surprises us with both its enthusiasm and ingenuity.

SAIL's Best Boats 2014: Fountaine Pajot Victoria 67

by SAIL Editors, Posted November 21, 2013
Over 65 feet you’re getting into big boat territory, and when you start talking about a catamaran with more than 31 feet of beam, as is the case with the Fountaine Pajot Victoria 67, there’s little doubt you’re dealing with a “flagship.” 

Gunboat 34

by Sail Staff, Posted August 23, 2004
Flush with the success of the aggressive Gunboat 62, Peter Johnstone and multihull designers Morelli & Melvin have brought the same go-fast and go-comfortable approach to the new Gunboat 34. It's designed to be easy to singlehand and to easily log double-digit speeds under sail. All lines lead to the helm station, which is located in the center of the open bridgedeck under a hardtop. Living

Corsair Sprint 750

by Bill Springer, Posted September 23, 2005
The new Corsair Sprint 750 represents a high-octane evolution of the successful Corsair 24. Its length and overall profile are similar to the 24’s, but over 100 pounds have been trimmed from the hull and the cockpit has been lengthened at the expense of some interior volume in the cuddy cabin. The cabin has a small double bunk and a place to put an optional porta-potty, but accommodations space

Herreshoff 65

by Charles Mason, Posted July 12, 2005
It’s late morning on a hot and nearly windless day off Miami Beach, Florida, and the late-February sun is beginning to make the irregular swells look larger than they really are. But the undulating water still retains some of the power from a weather system that has long since moved on. Around us, sailboats are heaving and rolling randomly in the calms, their sails powerless to steady

Transit 380

by Bill Springer, Posted August 22, 2006
It’s easy to see why the Optimist is the boat of choice for the youngest sailors, but what’s not so clear is where those still-young sailors go when they’ve outgrown the Opti. Designer Jim Taylor and Precision Boatworks have addressed the need for a transition boat between the Opti and larger, more powerful boats like the Laser or the 420 with the new Transit 380. It’s a stable
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