Boats

Dufour 455

by James Jermain, Posted September 23, 2005
Forty years ago Michel Dufour dragged boatbuilding into the industrial age by being one of the first to design boats specifically for production building methods. The company came out of some recent financial troubles and launched a “new era” in 2003. Since then two parallel but carefully matched lines of cruising boats have been introduced.One is a group of performance

Le Breton SIG45

by Dave Baldwin, Posted March 3, 2006
You have to admire Hugo Le Breton for setting the bar high with his new SIG 45. His goal was simple and ambitious: to combine the high-performance design elements of an ocean-racing multihull with the style of a contemporary cruising monohull. The result is a 45-foot racer-cruiser that comfortably accommodates six and can hit top speeds of over 20 knots. The SIG 45 features

Raider 30

by Charles J. Doane, Posted August 25, 2004
The recent proliferation of large cruising catamarans has been well documented, but there is also an increasing number of smaller performance catamarans that offer modest living accommodations for go-fast racer/cruiser types. One of the most interesting of these is the Raider 30, a very sleek craft that was born four years ago in Australia and debuted in the U.S. early last year. There

Telstar 28

by Bill Springer, Posted July 14, 2004
When a fire destroyed the molds for the Telstar trimarans in 1981, Performance Cruising founder and designer Tony Smith rebuilt his factory and started production of the Gemini catamarans. Gemini's success pushed the Telstars to the back of, but not completely off, the drawing board. After years spent redesigning, re-engineering, and rigorously testing five full-size prototypes, Smith has

Andrews 45

by Peter Nielsen, Posted September 21, 2006
West Coaster Alan Andrews has drawn a long line of fast racing sleds, and with this 45-footer he shows that he can turn his mind to cruising too—fast cruising, that is. The Andrews 45 has pretty though reasonably conventional above-waterline looks, but a peek below the bootstripe reveals a stilettolike spade rudder and deep T-keel that obviously mean business. With just 12 feet, 7 inches of beam,

Briand 78

by Sail Staff, Posted September 29, 2006
Whimsy, designed by naval architect Philippe Briand, was launched by Vaudrey Miller Yachts late last summer. The owner, an experienced racing yachtsman who formerly managed a major British design agency, was deeply involved in the project, whose guiding principle was “less is more.” The end result is a very contemporary cruising yacht, which has a modern hull shape,

Rocket 22

by Kimball Livingston, Posted April 3, 2007
(Click here for PDF version)This is not another sportboat designed to do nothing but scream downwind. The Rocket 22 is an update of the Gary Mull–designed Pocket Rocket that has commanded a loyal following in the Pacific Northwest since the 1980s. Don Martin’s design brief was to use cutting-edge materials and insight to turn

Tartan 4300

by Sail Staff, Posted August 6, 2008
Legend has it that back in the day, Charlie Britton, founder of Tartan Yachts, once fired a .45 at one of his boats to show that it was "bulletproof." Designed by Sparkman & Stephens, the first Tartans were popular boats early in the fiberglass era. Tim Jackett, fresh out of school, came to work on the factory floor in 1974. Today he's CEO and in-house designer at Tartan (and at companion

Hallberg-Rassey 54

by Sail Staff, Posted August 11, 2008
This new 54-foot long-distance cruiser from the board of German Frers has received considerable interest since its introduction in Sweden last fall. An all-inclusive hydraulics package makes sail control easy, and the large engine room makes it easy to walk around and inspect the yacht's systems. The engine space is made quieter by perforated aluminum linings that cover the soundproofing for

Beneteau 54

by Sail Staff, Posted February 3, 2009
The Beneteau design team worked with Berret-Racoupeau Yacht Design and the Nauta Design Group to develop this new flagship of the Beneteau fleet. The design brief specified an elegant coachroof with good visibility, interior volume and comfort, ease of handling, and good performance offshore.Belowdeck, the long coachroof windows combine with the hull ports to allow lots of natural light to
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